"¿Fuistealaplayaenelbarco?"

Translation:Did you go to the beach on the boat?

4 months ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/1645316795269

Wouldn't the translation make more sense if it were to say, "Did you go to the beach by boat?"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I guess "Did you go to the beach by boat?" would be "¿Fuiste a la playa en bote?" .

"Did you go to the beach on the boat?" suggests to me a specific boat (for example a ferry or one's own boat).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

wha does "Did you go to the beach on the boat?" mean? how can there be a beach on the boat?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Frank253980

I think it means that you are traveling to the beach by boat.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I don't see why not. Some cruise liners are particularly well equipped.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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That is truly the most perverse interpretation I have ever seen! Which beach? That beach on the boat, man. Love it. Congratulations.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sabine959064

Report: by boat should be accepted

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SPanya4
SPanya4
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Why is 'by boat' not acceptable?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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I think this phrase indicates a mode of transport- by boat, by train, by road etc. Whereas "on THE boat" means speaker and listener are aware of a specific boat which you may have used. I believe you would say en barco, en tren (ie w/o the definite article) to imply "by boat" etc in this generic sense. Or por la carretera, por el mar, por el pie for even more generic by road, by sea, by foot.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xCPqjEjv
xCPqjEjv
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Need an explanation of the past tense. How is it formed?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmineHadji1
AmineHadji1
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There are rules of conjugation, that I will not explain here, to form the past of regular verbs in Spanish. However, here, we use the verb ir = to go which is strongly irregular, so you have to learn its conjugation by heart:

  • (Yo) fui = I went
  • (Tú) fuiste = You went [singular]
  • (Él/Ella/Usted) fue = He/She/It went
  • (Nosotr@s) fuimos = We went
  • (Vosotr@s) fuisteis = You went [plural]
  • (Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes) fueron = They went

P.S.: The past of ir and ser = to be is exactly the same, so fuiste can mean both you went and you were, depending on the context.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xCPqjEjv
xCPqjEjv
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Thanks I am beginning to learn about the past tense through you tube now and make notes.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/egretinc

I translated "were you" and it was marked wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David674273

I also translated it "Were you". How can we tell when to use which "fuiste"? Both seemed to work here.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_M_M_.
_M_M_.
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You have to remember the differences between ser and estar.

Fuiste is the past tense for ir and ser. It can be translated as "were you" in situations that would use ser.

"were you at the beach" (a location) would be the past tense of estar, not ser, so this must be the past tense of ir.

4 months ago
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