Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Yo ya bebí un té caliente, gracias."

Translation:I already drank a hot tea, thanks.

2 months ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eSQBurTa

it really is unfortunate to force an English speaker to say "a hot tea" when in English we would correctly require a unit of measurement "a cup of hot tea" or omit "a" entirely. Similarly, enough with the "juices" - we don't pluralize that either.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spinge
spinge
  • 22
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 39

Let's consider that we heard a Spanish speaker say this. The speaker only specified that he has had 'a hot tea'. He could have had it in a glass, a mug or any other container or measure. That information is not provided. So in English "I already drank hot tea" would be the correct translation.

Unless he says, "una taza de té caliente", I don't think we need to assume it to be 'a cup' of tea in English.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanneBrown1

in UK we would say 'I have already drunk' not' I already drank'

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
Mod
  • 19
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Those are two different tenses in Spanish. Duo is trying to show how the preterite and present perfect are different. There are situations where either works (in English and Spanish), but they are trying to emphasize how they are different.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ursulias
Ursulias
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 21
  • 20
  • 11
  • 6
  • 751

I think this is really complicated. The peninsular Spanish requires the preterito perfecto compuesto after "ya". It is a must. (Keywords for the pr. perf. c. are hoy, este/esta, ya, últimamente ...) The Latinamerican grammar seems to be different. Both should be accepted, the Latinamerican and the Peninsular Spanish. Just like BE and AE.
I learned that the peninsular pr.perf.comp. translates to present perfect in BE.
Therefore I report it.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

I'm not sure that the use of "ya" requires a present perfect.

According to the link below, "yet" and "still" (ya, aún, todavía) are "frequently" used. That is they are only indicators, and don't "require" the past perfect.

https://www.curso-ingles.com/aprender/cursos/nivel-avanzado/verb-tenses-present-perfect/present-perfect

Ejemplos: Él ya está aquí." (He is already here.)

¿Ya te vas? (Are you leaving already?)

Todavía lo voy a hacer. (I am still going to do it.)

"Muchos de los instrumentos para una mayor integración ya existen." (Many of the instruments for greater integration already exist.)

Ya es hora de tener fe en el mercado. (It is time to have faith in the market.)

"China es ya un miembro activo de la comunidad económica y política mundial". (China is now an active member of the world economic and political community.)

¿Sigues yendo todavía? (Are you still going?) ¿Sigues yendo ya?

http://www.spanishdict.com/examples/ya

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ursulias
Ursulias
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 23
  • 21
  • 20
  • 11
  • 6
  • 751

I think we don't really have a chance to find "the" correct answer.

Here is a "Trabajo de final de máster." -

https://dugi-doc.udg.edu/bitstream/handle/10256/10073/CunatLochteMiriam_Treball.pdf?sequence=1

Anyhow - the complexity of this shows, that DL should accept more varieties. It is definitely wrong to mark something wrong that is correct in peninsular Spanish, just as it is wrong to not accept an answer, although it is correct in US-American English.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Really? I've never noticed that.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spinge
spinge
  • 22
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 39

I already drank hot tea = Ya bebí un té caliente. I have already drunk hot tea = Ya he bebido un té caliente.

Does not really matter in International English.

Although, in UK English, we could also say "I already took hot tea" or "I have already taken hot tea".

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benjaminwh226314

Anyone know if 'te caliente' is the most common way to say this for spanish speakers? In Australia we just say 'tea' without need to specify its temperature, for example.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eSQBurTa

it the States you have to specify if you want hot tea or iced tea. i don't know about in other nations...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
Mod
  • 19
  • 15
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

I'm from the Northeast and never say "hot tea". When people ask for tea here, it's assumed a cup of hot tea. It's only iced tea that needs the adjective.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lingolizard
Lingolizard
  • 25
  • 21
  • 21
  • 15
  • 15
  • 12
  • 9

I think Duolingo should accept 'a hot cup of tea'. It's my understanding that in many English speaking places you need to specify that you want a 'cup of (...)', or that would be the most common way of phrasing it.

1 month ago