https://www.duolingo.com/Jileha

Is this sentence correct?

I am currently evaluating the Irish material of Glossika. In the translation section, I got this sentence:

This morning I brushed my teeth. Nigh mé m'fhiacla ar maidin.

Do you really "wash" your teeth in Ireland? Since toothbrush is "scuab fiacal", wouldn't "scuab" be the more natural choice? Or "glan"?

Wouldn't you use "mo chuid fiacla"?

In case anyone has used (or is using) Glossika, I'd also like to hear your opinion on that program in general.

Go raibh math agaibh!

July 16, 2018

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1106

You can use scuab or , but nowadays scuab is more prevalent.
"I brushed my teeth" - scuab mé m'fhiacla, scuab mé mo chuid fiacla
"to brush your teeth (also to clean your teeth)" - do chuid fiacla a ní, do chuid fiacla a scuabadh

As for cuid, that's a bit of an ecumenical matter. Even the grammatical purists have to decide whether there are considered a permanent fixture, like fingers, or removable, like hair. Nowadays, teeth are usually permanent, so maybe cuid shouldn't be used.

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TadhgRuda

In Donegal the word 'cár' is used instead of 'fiacla', e.g. 'nigh do chár(a)' (I think in some parts of the Donegal Gaeltacht, it's pronounced 'cára')

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jileha

Even the grammatical purists have to decide whether there are considered a permanent fixture, like fingers, or removable, like hair. Nowadays, teeth are usually permanent, so maybe cuid shouldn't be used.

I forgot about that criterion. Hm, all my wisdom teeth had to be extracted. Do I have to use "chuid" now? :)

Thanks! As always, you are extremely helpful!

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MahoganyGaspipe

I would go with mo chuid fiacla here.

The rule that one omits cuid with inalienable possessions, such as body parts, seems to be increasingly ignored by Connacht speakers (and Donegal speakers, I believe). I heard "a cuid lámha" and "a cuid cosa"[*] in Conamara recently!

Though the Munster dialects still follow the rule, cuid fiacla also occurs there. I therefore suspect that fiacail is not inalienable for this purpose. Though fiacla can occur without cuid in Munster dialects, they often omit cuid with plural possessions anyway.

For what it's worth, Wiktionary also supports this usage: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cuid

Hm, all my wisdom teeth had to be extracted. Do I have to use "chuid" now?

As stated, I think the point is moot with fiacail. In general, I doubt it makes a difference: inalienable possessions removed from you—if your legs were amputated, say—would still, notionally, be yours.

[*] Younger Conamara speakers are also forsaking genitive forms.

July 18, 2018
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