https://www.duolingo.com/ParkerStaff

A2-C1 in three months?

Hi! I currently live in London and have been studying Spanish on my own for about a year. I believe that currently I am at an A2 level. At my work they are opening a new Spanish speaking department and they will be hiring on a number of levels. I would like to go for one of these. I am seriously considering taking 3 months off and moving to Spain to study Spansih. Ideally I would like to go to Barcelona, but I don't think that would be ideal because I'm trying to learn Spanish and I don't think Barcelona would be best because of the use of Catalan. So I'm thinking Valencia might be the best bet. I will hopefully be moving there and staying in a room in a AirB&B with only Spanish speakers. And while i'm there I want to complete a 12 week immersion course in a Language school. My goal is to be as close to a C1 level as possible in these three months. I'm hoping to get there by not speaking English at all in these three months and fully surrounding myself only with Spanish while completing this 12 week intensive course. Does anyone have an experience of doing something similar? Is it possible/Probably to go from A2-C1 in three months? Thanks for your help! x

4 months ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/paulmexicodf

A2 - B2 in 3 months, it is possible if you are dedicated

A2 -C1 in 3 months, pues for me it took about 750 hours of study just to move from high B2 to low C1, but thats just me, for me the difference between B2 and C1 was just huge, and the strange thing is it is not really anything concrete, its just the way you think which takes time change.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Willow868

Thank you for giving my brain a refresher of the word Pues. Took me a minute, but then I remembered it is "well." :-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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A2 to B2 in three months is possible but even that is extremely ambitious and challenging. However, why not give it a try? No matter how far you get, it will be still be much farther ahead than if you hadn't tried.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icemule1
icemule1
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I notice you said "pues for me" - is that your Spanish creeping into your response?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmexicodf

jajajaja i never noticed that, yes , i dont actually speak english or spanish now, just a kind of pocho

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.Gregor
E.T.Gregor
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paulmexicodf's reply gave me the idea to try a mathematical approch: It took me approximately 110 hours of classes/200 hours of studying (generous estimate for how much time I might have spent on homework) to get from A1/A2 (hard to say, my first year of Spanish classes was poor on grammar, but high on speaking practise) to passing a B2 exam. If we take my number for B2 and paul's for C1 (total of 950 hours), you'd need to study a little more than eleven hours every day (which of course includes just plain speaking practise) to reach a C1 level. I'd say that's doable.

Now, of course, mandatory reminder that people learn differently. Although my guess is that, constantly surrounded by Spanish, you'd learn faster than I did in a class once a week.

Another thing, though... They speak Valenciano in Valencia, which is considered a variety of Catalan. Not everybody speaks it (for example, of the six people I know from there, exactly half do), but if you discounted Barcelona for that reason, I'm not sure if Valencia is that much of a better choice. In addition, the Spanish dialect spoken in the region isn't very "standard" (one of my Valencian colleagues sounds almost like he's from Andalucìa). Why not Madrid or Toledo (historically considered the places where Standard Spanish is spoken)?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Penlope945208

Valenciano is not the lingua franca in Valencia .. it is castellano. Catalan is huge in Barcelona .. so you will get Spanish in Valencia. It is a lovely city to be in as not too big, has good beaches, buildings, market. Good choice.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Penlope945208

PS I recently spent 3 months in Barcelona and all Catalans speak catalan .. such a lovely city but I heard much more catalan in the streets and shops than spanish. Valencia definitely better for the spanish experience.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Getting from B2 to C1 is generally considered much more difficult than getting to B2 from A1/A2 and it's not just a matter of time.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mel211619

Many years ago, the BBC did a Spanish TV course which they based in Cuenca (Las Casa Colgadas) on the basis that the Spanish spoken there was a fraction slower and was perhaps equivalent to the best spoken English.

I don't know if that is really true, but my Spanish has always been understood and I've been helped in Cuenca when visiting the area.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hajo_Smith

Biochemical processes in the brain can not be accelerated at will. There are self-experiences documented on YouTube which show that you can reach a pretty good level within 3 months but not fluency on Level C. And if you search for Polyglots you‘ll find out that they all have their own learning methode but don‘t waste their time and money in class rooms. A teacher one hour per day would be sufficient to correct your errors and train the pronunciation. You can find private teachers for low prices on www.italki.com . The rest of the time you have to practice by your own especially by Repetition in order to expose your brain with a massive input. And keep in mind that the intake capacity of our brain for new things is quite limited. So learn constantly and don‘t try to force your brain, don‘t destroy your motivation by expecting too much.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seattle_scott
Seattle_scottPlus
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If you study in Valencia then try and live in a smaller village nearby. The larger the city, the more English speakers you’ll find, and the higher the chance that conversations will default to English.

For beginning learners I recommend more rural towns. People will be less bilingual and will have more time, patience and interest in helping you.

I took this approach in both France and Japan and it was very helpful. In both cases I spent 6-12 months in a rural area and then moved to the big city (Grenoble/Tokyo). Once I wasn’t stumbling all over myself people were less and less likely to go into English when I faultered and needed help.

If you can, get a part time job in customer service. A bar, restaurant, bistro, etc. huge huge help if you can. And go to sleep and wake listening To the tv and radio. Flood your brain with constant input.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/desamaru

Hola, ParkerStaff. El reto que te has propuesto es muy interesante. Quizá este video de Luca Lampariello te pueda dar una idea de lo que significa pasar de un nivel de "Fluidez a uno de Proficiencia". De igual manera te deseo mucha suerte en tu reto. Best wishes in your project!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Penlope945208

I have recently done an immersion course in Madrid. the studying side was mornings only and you were left to your own devices in the afternoons. There were some evening get togethers but these were mostly late, ie starting at 10pm which was a bit late for me. The house they booked me in to was ok but other students who were german spoke english mostly although the hostess did sit with us for supper and tried to keep the Spanish side going. I think the suggestion further down that you get some sort of job as well, waiter or even helping in a shelter or somewhere is a good one - doing something else while learning the language really works. Read a book with the audio so you hear it as well. You need to use multiple sources to get to the level you want to in that time frame. Suerte !!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
Thomas.Heiss
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Hi,

why is it necessary for your job to reach the C1 level now within 3 months?

I am almost sure that I do not have a higher C1 language level in English, especially for speaking, as there are almost zero opportunities to use English in Germany on a daily, weekly or monthly basis.

I have been "practicing" this language for more than 23 years (school years not counting in) including business (IT/EDV).

Set (too) high goals and you will fail!
Wenn man sich schon konkrete Ziele setzt, sollte man sich besser kurze realistische Ziele vornehmen, die man dann auch wirklich zeitnah erreichen kann.
Ein Schritt nach dem Anderen.

I believe that currently I am at an A2 level.

Wouldn't the next logical step be B1 after A1/A2?

If you are only learning the language on Duolingo since one year, you do not really know if you would pass an official A2 test regards to grammar (writing) or speaking?!?

Maybe you can ask a teacher if the training can be setup for B2, so you can still decide in the end of your three months period if you want to go for the B1 or B2 certificate.

I am sure I would completely fail if I had to do it for Portuguese and and to reach B2 or C1 shortly, even I have been learning this language for about one year and eight months ;)

Good luck with your mission! Have fun!

Viel Erfolg! Viele Grüße

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

I think you can do it from London. Use the money to pay for your tutors. Do it like this guy:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RvhtpRnZWQ

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joanna_Mallorca

Thanks for that link!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/indigobloom

I have a few thoughts- First, you cement memory while sleeping, so my advice would be to try and get as many nights as possible of proper rest. Second, hypnosis is pretty powerful, as it pretty much persuades your subconcious to do things it already wants to do. I found this article where it mentions that "Put more simply, hypnosis can make sure you’re in the right state of mind to receive information effectively and recall it later." https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/can-hypnosis-help-you-learn-a-language/

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHill6

The further you move away from Valencia city, the more you are likely you are to hear Valenciano than pure Castellano. Valenciano is a dialect of Catalan. I would suggest moving to Madrid or any of the cities in the center of the country (Castilla) to really learn Castellano. There you are less likely to run into people that want to speak English with you. Also I would suggest studying for one of the DELE exams to certify your level. It is one thing to say you speak a certain level and it is another to have proof. These exams are given by Instituto Cervatnes on behalf of the Spanish Government. That said, C1 is a proficiently fluent level at a professional level. I think it could take a year to several years to get to a C1 level of full immersion and studying to achieve this level. A B1 or B2 level are totally doable in 3-6 months if you study grammar and vocabulary in addition to a full immersion experience. I have passed the C1 DELE exam and I can tell you that it is a difficult exam/level to reach but it is doable with lots of study and immersion.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
Thomas.Heiss
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Maybe not relevant for you...but maybe others?

Quote Parkerstaff: I don't think Barcelona would be best because of the use of Catalan

AFAIK you need to learn Spanish first on Duolingo, to be able to learn Catalan (from Spanish) as no German or English base courses are available.

For those Europeans (Germans/Italian/French or English speakers) who actually would like to visit Barcelona one day and want to learn Catalan BEFORE outside of Duolingo, I had found this free course: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/26604743/Catalan-Learn-for-free-on-Glossika-unlimited-free-reps-sentence-practice

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHill6

You should learn Spanish first in General. Nearly 100% of Catalan speakers know castellano, but not the other way around. Really only ~4mm people speak catalan as their first languange. There are another about 6 or 7mm that know how to speak it and understand it as a second language. If you really want to learn Catalan, a good place to do it online is parla.cat, which has notes in nearly all the major European languages. That said, I have taken the basic course and in Spain I have never once used my basic Catalan other than to read some street signs.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Heiss
Thomas.Heiss
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Which region language / dialect from Spain is the most easiest to understand if you learned Portuguese Brazil, but are not trained on Portuguese EU/Portugal pronunciation?


Is the language from Andalucía (Malaga, Tarifa) very different to Castallian Spanish or Catalan?

Tarifa is a great area for kitesurfing:
https://bstoked.net/locations/spain/
https://bstoked.net/listings/search/?destinations=1921

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHill6

Really there are two main dialects of "Spanish" in Spain and the dividing line is between north and south. Let's call them Castellano and Andaluz, respectively. Andaluz, is the dialect spoken in Andalucia. I would say that it is much harder for a new learner to understand / learn Andaluz as the pronunciation is much more "relaxed" where they don't pronounce every letter and often aspirate S. Some regions in andalucia are ceceante, where they pronounce every S, C and Z as a TH. Others are seseante, where they pronounce every S, C and Z as an S. Essentially, they are the same Language, with differing pronunciation and slight grammar and vocabulary differences. I speak Spanish at a C1 and even I have a heard time with Andaluz at times. The dialect spoken in the center and north is much more clearly pronounced, in my opinion, and is the dialect you would hear spoken on Spanish TV. Apart from that, Spain has 3 other languages which are spoken in Galicia (Gallego), Cataluña (Catalan) and Pais Vasco (Euskera). Gallego is probably the closest to Portuguese. Some even say it is a dialect of Portuguese. To me it sounds like Portuguese spoken with a Spanish accent.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HunkyP
HunkyP
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Because most Spanish in the New World was mainly influenced by Andalusian, not Castellano, settlers, if you've been exposed to most versions of Latin American Spanish already then the Andalusian dialect might be both simpler and better understood back in the Western Hemisphere. The dropping of final consonants that MichaelHill6 is describing is also a feature of Chilean and other Latin accents, for instance. But virtually no Latin American speakers ceceante. Which is why Castellano speakers tend to stand out more and why the TH lisp is often the precise feature that Latin American speakers key on when they're making fun of Spain. And of course it should go without saying that all the versions are equally Spanish at this point and that Madrid Castellano is not some sort of universal standard.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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All the people in the towns around Tarifa joke that the people in Tarifa are crazy because of all the wind!

4 months ago
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