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  5. "मैं प्यासी हूँ।"

"मैं प्यासी हूँ।"

Translation:I am thirsty.

July 19, 2018

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roma_venka

This has the connotation of "I am desirous," which is why मुझे प्यास लग रही है is much better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam362597

Oh, the trouble I could get myself into if it weren't for helpful notes like this....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mazpeterslove

Don't worry... For someone learning the language for the first time, it won't get you in trouble. They will giggle... And give you water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

Why even teach something of the sort in the first place?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguisticBoi

Because the mods of this course want us to accidentally make innuendos when asking for water /s

No but seriously WHY


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emrys29

प्यासी doesn't have the connotation that thirsty has in English. I'm a native speaker of Hindi I have never seen it used that way. In हिंदी हवस and जिस्म की भूख is used for innuendos.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92
Mod
  • 1367

प्यासी definitely has the same connotations. 'हवस' and 'जिस्म की भूख' are not exactly innuendoes. They straight up mean 'lust' while प्यास is used to 'suggest' it.

In fact, the use of 'thirst' as innuendo in Indian languages goes back to Puranic literature where तृष्णा (the Sanskrit word for thirst) is frequently employed for this purpose.

That said, the word can also be used to refer to chaster desires. For instance, you can find 'दर्शन की प्यासी' (desirous of a vision) in Bhakti (devotional) literature.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sivapriya15

'दर्शन की प्यासी' I love that! <3

Jai Shiv Shambhu!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vg

जिस्म is a urdu word meaning body from an arabic origin الجسم . तन is the hindi word for body.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

The distinction between Urdu and Hindi is blurred on the ground level


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JGvXPd

This is fine, but "मुझे प्यास लगी है" is a lot better to express thirst.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aakhil6

Is प्यास a feminine noun? And any idea how?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vg

I am guessing लगी makes it feminine. लगा would be the masculine form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

There's no reason why. It just is a female noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vg

I agree. "मुझे प्यास लगी है" is more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aakhil6

Why cant we just say मुझे प्यास लगती है (for the present tense) or मुझे प्यास लगी। (can the है be omitted if we were talking about past tense) or मुझे प्यास लग रही है (if we are talking about the present continuous tense) ?? And which grammatical tense does the sentence "मुझे प्यास लगी है" talks of ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92
Mod
  • 1367

मुझे प्यास लगी है is the present perfect tense. It is somewhat preferred over the present continuous while talking about the state of being thirsty (similar to 'मैं बैठा हूँ' for I am seated). मुझे प्यास लगती है is the simple present tense meaning 'I (usually) feel thirsty'. 'मुझे प्यास लगी' is a valid past tense form but again, the past perfect form 'मुझे प्यास लगी थी' is preferred to say that you were thirsty in the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoaoDSouza

With the copula, it has a stative meaning. I am thirsty, I was thirsty. Without the copula, it has the inchoative meaning. I got thirsty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sid1971

Nope. I am sid1971


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguisticBoi

dad joke intensifies


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vg

How do we differentiate between मैं प्यासा हूँ। and मैं प्यासी हूँ ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emrys29

मैं प्यासा हूँ। would be said by a man.
मैं प्यासी हूँ | would be said by a woman. They both mean the same. "I am thirsty."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vg

Exactly. But the answer above only translates to the feminine form, and not the masculine form.

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