"जूलिया को सलाद चाहिए।"

Translation:Julia wants salad.

July 19, 2018

16 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hptroll

It introduces the oblique case for Julia. You give something TO someone. Same in Hindi where “को” would be the equivalent of “to” in this instance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBestOfA1

But this sentence is "Julia wants salad". There's no giving, and there's no "to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92

The Hindi sentence roughly translates to something along the lines of 'To Julia, salad is wanted'.
You can also use a sentence which is much more like the English sentence - जूलिया सलाद चाहती है - which also means 'Julia wants salad'.
But the sentence with चाहिए conveys the urgency of the desire. Therefore, it would be understood that Julia wants a salad right now as opposed to sometime in the future. It can also be used to convey strength of the desire.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FauxShizzle

How do you differentiate between "wants" and "needs"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.qfwfq.

Generally by context i guess


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neilymon

please accept "julia wants a salad" - thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

Report it, but from what I've learnt so far, the course has been fairly consistent. Wouldn't that be: जूलिया को एक सलाद चाहिए।


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinaysaini

In Hindi, सलाद is usually an uncountable /material noun. So stick with जूलिया को सलाद चाहिए। IMHO :) Furthermore, there are no articles in Hindi, so एक सलाद would not sound natural even if it were a countable noun.

As for English, "I want a salad" may be added as an acceptable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neilymon

"I want salad" would only be used in English if, say, one was at a dinner table and there was a bowl of salad. "I want a salad" (a salad entree) is much more commonly used. I believe the Hindi phrase in the question would apply to both of these scenarios, but I'm curious what the mods think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rodrigogar496159

This ek(one) here sounds bizarre !


[deactivated user]

    I have written this and my answer accept

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