"Eselápiz,loquieroparamiclase."

Translation:That pencil, I want it for my class.

5 months ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

It is NOT a commonly used syntax in English. It is fine if the literal translation is counted as correct but no translator worth their salt would translate this into such stilted language. We do not translate age as "I have 25 years" or thirst as "I have thirst. "I want that pencil for my class." NEEDS to be included as a correct answer.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

This isn't the standard way people write sentences in English, and I thought Duolingo was about standard stuff. The sentence above looks and sounds like it came from someone whose native language is French. Please report this and all other new Spanish to English sentences like this.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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But this course is about Spanish, not English. This definitely sounds like a standard Spanish sentence.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Unfortunately, Duolingo does not agree with you. They typically not only expect us to translate a sentence from the language being taught back to English, they also insist upon proper English as well. I know--and you probably know too--that the moderators of the French and Turkish courses would not accept your argument, rightly or wrongly. The problem here isn't about word order in the Spanish sentence--which is fine. The problem is insisting that the same word order be used in English.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

With all due respect, I think you've got the wrong take, SuhailBanister. This sentence, whose structure you dislike so much, IS standard/proper English. As we students progress, it's particularly important to learn less used, but equally correct, sentence structures.

If this construction is typically Spanish, I need to know it so that when I translate Spanish as I read it, I won't pause because I'm not familiar with how Spanish phrases it. I already do this with with colloquialisms I've already learned, such as reading "le gustas" and going straight to "you like him." I didn't do this at first. I learned to do this by first thinking the literal "Him you are pleased by" -> "You are pleased by him" -> "You like him."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

Unfortunately you are missing the point. It is this: Duolingo marks, "That pencil, I want it for my class," as right. On the other hand, using "I want that pencil for my class"--the more common usage by far--is rejected for no obvious reason. My call for others to report this is nothing more than an effort to get Duo to accept both translations equally. ¿Estamos?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Linda, I'm pretty sure your example (le gustas) isn't "you like him," but rather "he likes you."

Gustar doesn't mean to like, but rather to be pleasing to. The verb ending reflects what/who is doing the pleasing, and the indirect object pronoun reflects who is being pleased.

Me gustan los perros = Dogs are pleasing to me = I like dogs.
Le gustas = you (tú) are pleasing to him = He likes you.

You like him = He is pleasing to you = Te gusta (él).

Confusing, I know!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliT.Firef
AliT.Firef
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It's a fine SPANISH sentence. But you can't translate it word-for-word into English. DL should know better than to behave like Google translate on a bad day!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mad.eleine

The English translation sounds ridiculously unnatural to me

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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I find it odd that so many English speakers throughout this unit keep complaining about this kind of syntax, I have watched a few English-speaking TV shows and I have heard this syntax quite often, so what happened? Does English not have vocative any more?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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This syntax is incredibly common in speech, but few people think about the structure of speech. In school, every American was taught to never write in this format, since it is considered sloppy. We had it drilled into us to reformat it into, "I want that pencil for my class."

Some people assume that every sentence must be formal, since it's written on their screen. I'm not knocking formal writing (I'm a teacher after all), but we need these conversational style sentences too.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuhailBanister

No argument there. But the original issue has been ignored by you and others: Duolingo, in egregious condradiction to its practice in other courses, marks the newer conversational style translation as right and the more formal translation as wrong. (One could never imagine Sitesurf in the French course agreeing to such a thing, but that is beside the point!) Why can't both translations be accepted? I continue to recommend that this be reported by as many students as possible until fixed.

(BTW, it's super to see an active, living, moderator on the Spanish course once more. It seems to be a sign that Duolingo is giving this language its propers at last. Congratulations, and I hope you accept my comments--more often sounding grumpier than intended--as a token of how much I care. If you had anything to do with the latest reiteration and the expansion of the world list, triple kudos! ;-) )

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielconcasco
Danielconcasco
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I'm sorry, SuhailBanister, but I'd appreciate it if you didn't accuse me of ignoring an issue I have no control over. I'm a moderator, not a course contributor. The most I could do is relearn the lessons and use the report button.

With that said, I'm not a fan of this phrasing. I'm a Latin teacher and you might imagine I prefer formal language. I just have to accept this is what Duo wants right now and not let it get in the way of my learning.

And I do appreciate being appreciated. This is my time to give back to the forums.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mara186484

"I want that pencil for my class" was not accepted. WHY? Oh my it made sense! Seriously why is this correct answer not accepted?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyAnne709034

Again although correct technically, the answer they want is not the way us English folk say this type of thing! When people come to England they want to say things like we do in England so it is not just about translating it to suit Spanish- we are meant to be learning the differences in the languages too.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewHague

I think that the reason 'I want that pencil...' is not accepted is that DL is trying to teach us 'lo - it'

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewHague

And the sentence construction might well be used in standard English as an exclamation. That pencil! I want it for my class.

2 weeks ago
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