"Aamir has to come to my home."

Translation:आमिर को मेरे घर आना है।

July 19, 2018

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza

You're using the wrong construction to mean must. Must is expressed better by hogā than hai. This is more like want

July 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vinaysaini

The word 'must' is not shown in the English version, it is 'has to'. And it seems, the construction is actually the transalation of Hindi sentence because they are teaching Hindi here.

BTW, what will be the translation of 'आमिर को मेरे घर आना है।' according to you?

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza

"Aamir wants to/has got to come to my place." To express must, I'll use "hogā"/"rahegā" depending on the dialect or "paṛegā"

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vinaysaini

Isn't the reverse translation of "Aamir wants to come to my home.", "आमिर मेरे घर आना चाहता है।" correct?
And,
Have to and have got to convey the same meaning, don't they?

Dear brother, we are natives. For me, I am already thinking that I've mistakenly entered this (sentence) forum, because I found that most learners are identifying me as non-native within this forum. I also got insulting remarks from one, which I am finding very hard to forget.
What I am thinking is that nitpicking / hair splitting with the course material by us may make learning more complicated for the learners of Hindi. So, from now on, I am not going to write any more within sentence forum until officially invited to do so in a moderator role.

Returning to the grammar of the sentence, I am quoting R. S. McGregor, the author of the famous Oxford Hindi-English Dictionary:
"The idea of compulsion or of positive obligation is expressed by association of the infinitive form of a verb with a following part of the verbs "पड़ना, meaning literally, 'fall' or 'be found', or होना 'to be'. Use of पड़ना may express a marginally stronger compulsion or obligation."

Examples: -
मुझे पाँच बजे तक काम करना पड़ता है। - I have to work till five o'clock (daily).
मुझे पाँच बजे तक काम करना है। - I have to work till five o'clock (today).
मुझे पाँच बजे तक काम करना पड़ेगा / होगा। - I will have to work till five o'clock (today).

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoaoDSouza

Actually, the infinitive+hai construction means different things in different contexts and "have got to" is only one context. Not all that common. The construction can also be used to show intention other than obligation. Therefore, "मुझे पाँच बजे तक काम करना है," can also mean, "I intend to work till five o'clock." This construction should therefore not be just taught as the main translation for "must/have to". Moreover, just because the third example is in future tense, it doesn't have to be translated into English with future tense. The same sentence might use different tenses in different languages. The Hindi sentence is the equivalent for both the future and the present tense in English in this case. It simply depends on context. Now think if I use this construction in a sentence such as, "मुझे भी जाना है।" Here too, it will depend on the context if it's a desire or an obligation

July 23, 2018
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