"Jejich tým ještě nikdo neporazil."

Translation:No one has defeated their team yet.

July 20, 2018

15 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rosemarie45933

"No one has yet defeated their team". This translation is also semantically correct and should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

I would agree that your version is fine, though MAYBE used less frequently. You might report it, if you haven't already done so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TS3qz

Hello! Jejich tým ještě nikdo neporazil. May I ask how do you say: Their team has not defeated anyone yet. Thank you for your help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Jejich tým ještě nikoho neporazil.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TS3qz

Thank you very much for your reply. "Nikoho" never hits me....I need to study harder...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephan881810

why not " no one defeated their team yet"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrikMokry

Their team wasn't defeated/beat yet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Your suggested sentence uses a passive construction, while the original is active, so it may not be accepted. It's best to keep translations as close as possible to the original.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephan881810

i asked why "nobody defeated their team yet" is not accepted. I did not even receice a reply. This is quite disappointing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrikMokry

The word "yet" propably belongs to present perfect tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

In my AmE opinion, as a practical matter, there's only a minor difference between the use of "has defeated" and "defeated" alone in a sentence like this, and I'd guess they are almost always used more or less interchangeably, at least in the US. In practice, both can be understood to mean that no other team -- up until this point in time -- has beaten "their team."

From a strict grammatical perspective, "has defeated" would be preferred, because the team's winning streak continues in the present. However, I would offer no objection to accepting the past tense here, if the course team is comfortable doing so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrikMokry

Please, I have one more question for you (off topic) Does a rule exist to use a preposition "FOR" with duration of time? Eg. We run FOR 15 minutes, we have been running FOR 15 minutes. The operation took (without FOR) 8 hours


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

I’ve been puzzling over this, and did some internet searching, and I still don't have something definitive to point to as The Answer.

I suspect there is or perhaps there was a clear rule at some point, but as English evolves, some of the rules that once could not be broken by "good" speakers are falling out of favor. Or I, being a native speaker, have forgotten many of them because they’ve been internalized and are no longer “thought about” very much. :-)

Both “We have been running 15 minutes” and “We have been running FOR 15 minutes” are fine, as is “The operation took 8 hours.”

But if we change the wording of the last sentence to, for example, “The operation was in progress...” we’re back to being able to use either “for 8 hours” or simply “8 hours” again.

So... I’d say that “for” can be safely left out most of the time -- except, as you noticed, when the verb is to take.. and that may just be "The Rule.”

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