"¡Qué jardín tan bonito!"

Translation:What a pretty garden!

4 months ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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When both "¡Qué bonito jardin!" and "¡Qué jardin bonito!" can translate to "What a beautiful garden!", then why does DL include the word tan and still translate to "What a beautiful garden!" ?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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Roger, it's not just DL that includes the word tan. I've always seen/heard this construction as a fairly common one for translating What a + adj. + noun!

¡Qué casa tan grande! What a big house!
¡Qué idioma tan interesante! What an interesting language!

I've also seen it with más in place of tan.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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You can either say "¡Qué bonito jardín!" or "¡Qué jardín tan bonito!", both mean the same thing. "¡Qué jardín bonito!" is incorrect.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveHarris809825

Actually, I considered using "pretty" but reckoned "beautiful" brought out the emphasis of «tan» more.

Plain, pretty, beautiful? Any takers? :-)

But then I came here and found Duo using "pretty" anyway!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Tan doesn't give it more emphasis, it compares the quality of the adjective to something that is not mentioned.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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You never get inconsistency of usage or redundancy or mulltiple meanings of one word in English thank goodness. It's why English is so famously easy to learn.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cody987722

Base - the bottom of a structure.

Base - in a crass or crude manner.

Base - a headquarters.

Base - a part of a baseball field.

Base - chemistry term, opposite of an acid.

Then there's bass, which is either a fish or a frequency of sound. Yup. No redundancy in English.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hrycewich
Hrycewich
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English has plenty of redundancies, homonyms, homophones, etc, we just don't notice them as often as we do when learning another language! And English isn't any easier to learn, especially if you're comparing it to other germamic/romantic languages. It's gained popularity as a "lingua franca" around the world largely in part to american influence in the last century, but what will probably maintain it's status as the language of travellers is its "neutrality". A lack of genders attached to nouns, formal and informal, plural and singular ways to say "you" among other things make it less confusing for people who's languages do have these characteristics. Not because its easier to learn!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

The poster who said English is easier to learn was being sarcastic. I agree with your post about American influence. Another reason for the ubiquity of English (in addition to the colonial/political) is the ease with which the language sucks in words from other languages. It makes it an ideal lingua franca in a rapidly changing world. But it doesn't make it easy.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo
antonmo
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what makes a language easy?

  1. lack of gender
  2. few verb tenses
  3. lack of case usage
  4. known sounds, easy prounciation
  5. few exceptions

English has it all, imho. I think most germanic languages fail on promounciation and gender, latin ones fail on verb tenses.

of course, it is also a matter of taste, and what languages you already know

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin10921

"What a garden, so pretty!" was not accepted. Why?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

Because in trying to translate an idiomatic expression literally, you have turned it into two phrases instead of one. Your answer might work as a mental trick to remind you the word order of the desired Spanish phrase. But it is not a technically correct translation, I don't think. And, honestly, "What a garden, so pretty!" sounds like something out of Jane Austen. "What a pretty garden!" is modern, simple AND correct.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jimyankee1
jimyankee1
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I prefer your translation, Elin10921. It seems more emphatic, which, I believe, is intended by the expression.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

Whatnis wrong with,"Que una Jardin bonita"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo
antonmo
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jardín is masculine. it also has an accent on the í. further more they don’t say it that way..

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dluzer
dluzer
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Is there a difference between "Qué jardín tan bonito" and "Qué jardín bonito"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo
antonmo
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it’s an expression construct, you need to use your first variant, or reverse jardín and bonito

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dluzer
dluzer
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For some reason in the Android Duolingo app it doesn't show all the comments before you make a post so I didn't see that a similar question had already been asked

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PetrosAnt

I don't get it. "Qué.. tan bonito" sometimes gets translated into "What a pretty..." and other times into "...is so pretty" with duolingo always marking as wrong one of them. Shouldn't it accept both translations every time?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Guillermo8330

It's two different usages:

"¡Qué jardín tan bonito!" is the conventional form of the Spanish for "What a pretty garden!" (NOTE: both languages use "what" or "qué" to begin the exclamation, but neither sentence is a question. It's just a convention to use the interrogative word "what" or "qué" to begin the exclamation.)

"El jardín es tan bonito." translates to "The garden is so pretty." In both cases "so" and "tan" are words used for emphasis; the garden is more than merely "pretty", it is "so pretty" and "tan bonito". All of these usages are essentially arbitrary, but they have become accepted by convention. This is how all languages work: certain word patterns become normalized through common usage. We just have to practice until we get used to the Spanish equivalent of the English most of us already know.

4 weeks ago
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