"Ellos quieren dos jugos."

Translation:They want two juices.

4 months ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
PeterStockwellPlus
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Strange sentence.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rotimi_babalola
rotimi_babalola
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Muy raro

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DashaSlepenkina
DashaSlepenkina
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Question: A Spanish friend told me that "jugo" is a bizarre way to say "juice." She said that it evokes juice from meat, rather than from a fruit. For Spanish speakers, is this accurate? Is "zumo" better? For Latinamerican speakers, is "jugo" fine for you?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielzabuski
Danielzabuski
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Jugo for latinoamerica at least in Argentina, actually it is very uncommon to say zumo but we know the word. Nevertheless he is right we also use the word for the meat juices = los jugos de la carne.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DashaSlepenkina
DashaSlepenkina
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Thanks! I figured it was a regional difference - when I was in Spain, you saw "zumo" much more often, but in Mexico, it's always "jugo." Helps to get some confirmation :)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ttbaby9
ttbaby9
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Naranja y manzana

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jane821964
Jane821964
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I have never heard of jugo. Learned zumo

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheMerryDrinker
TheMerryDrinker
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When I was in Peru it’s was always jugo, in Spain zumo. However at both countries they knew the other word. In Peru someone explained zumo de naranja is fresh made, jugo is a bottle from the factory (or just the other way around, I forget). Does this make sense?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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That seems accurate. Zumo is specifically squeezed juice. Jugo may have some more trouble behind it.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_LilM_
_LilM_
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..is this the correct grammar?

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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For the English sentence, yes, although it's used very rarely. Usually you'd quantify the juices, saying "two glasses of juice" or "two kinds of juice".

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carl333610

Wouldn't a better translation be "two glasses of juice"? That, however, was rejected>

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielzabuski
Danielzabuski
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It is a good translation, also i readed it with all kind of beberages, but remember that here can be also, boxes of juice, envelopes, and more...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
PeterStockwellPlus
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The original sentence makes no mention of glasses.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carl333610

That is of course correct! However, where can I go and order “two juices”. Is this sentence acceptable in Spain? It appears to me that DUO sometimes cut sentences short.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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I believe that is the point DL is trying to make: In Spanish one may ask for "two juices," rather than "two glasses, bottles, cartons, etc. of juice," as we do in English.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aridneia

However, the English translation should make sense grammatically. If someone walked up to me where I work and asked for "two juices," I would know what they were talking about, but I would assume that they either don't understand grammar very well or that they are not native speakers.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FernSavannah

I think the only way to translate to an actual English sentence and convey what they are saying, would be "two portions of juice" (or more awkward: two units). It's not a direct translation, but it's more accurate to English, and since DL doesn't force us to write, "he has 21 years," over "he is 21 years old," it makes sense to me, that DL could accept "two portions of juice" as correct.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielzabuski
Danielzabuski
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Do you really say in daily english two portions of juice? Because in spanish it will be a big mistake, you just can ask for a portion of something to eat, but not for something to drink.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nEjh0qr4
nEjh0qr4
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It seems as though there is only one way around this. That is, when a learner sees "Ellos quieren dos jugos," s/he may offer his or her own translation (e.g., "They want two glasses of juice," "They want two bottles of juice," "They want two cartons of juice," etc.), and--if the translation is rejected--report "my answer should be accepted" until Duo adds all alternatives to the database. Seems a little silly, and a lot of unnecessary work for the volunteers modifying the database, but that might satisfy those who can't seem to accept Duo's current translation.

4 weeks ago
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