"Il faut savoir accepter sa condition d'homme."

Translation:It is necessary to accept the human condition.

March 27, 2013

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CWKCA
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What is "savoir" doing in here, exactly? If it were absent, how would the translation be different?

May 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/H_eyelid

I have this same question. In english this is strange and awkward; it is an idiom in french?

September 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

This is a good question. Here are two other, similar versions with almost the same meaning that we've seen thus far ... why is 'savoir' used only in this one? Is it because of 'il faut' ?

On doit accepter sa condition d'homme.

Tu dois accepter ta condition d'homme.

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"You must/should know how to accept" is the closest equivalent to "tu dois savoir accepter".

Savoir is often used when the meaning is "know how to" vs "know about" (connaître)

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

For what seems like the hundredth time, thanks again Sitesurf.

What's a bit confusing to students like myself is that 'savoir' didn't make it into the English translation but it sounds like it comes with 'il faut', which I can understand.

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CWKCA
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So "savoir" is part of the idiom here? Would "il faut accepter sa condition d'homme" be awkward French?

January 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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No, it works perfectly well.

January 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CWKCA
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I guess I would suggest to Duolingo, then, that it be accepted as a correct translation from the English.

January 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Dansdaci
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Can someone tell me why it is "Sa"? doesn't that mean "His/Hers" or is it because it is the form used with "On" too?

March 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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French possessive adjectives agree in gender and number with the thing owned, not with the owner.

"condition" is feminine singular, so the possessive adjective is feminine singular = "sa"

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Dansdaci
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Ahh yes, thanks I understand gender agreement... but that isn't my problem, sorry perhaps my question is badly phrased... I want to know why it is "Sa" instead of "Ta"/"Votre" to imply "your".

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"il faut" is an impersonal construction, stating a kind of universal truth. by default, impersonal "il" builds with the personal "il", so "sa" here.

If you are given the French first, you can translate "sa condition" in "your condition", "our condition" or "one's condition".

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Dansdaci
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Ahh okay, thanks it is the first time I had come across this, I hadn't though about building upon the impersonal version of "il".

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ngmuipai
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I don't think that's exactly correct, Sitesurf. We could be talking about a specific man, or a woman, or talking in generalities, and the sentence "Il faut savoir accepter sa condition d'homme" would be equally appropriate. "We must accept our..." or "You must accept your..." or "One must accept one's..." or even "He must accept his..." should all be acceptable. DL has "We must accept his...", which is frankly bizarre.

July 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"he" is not appropriate because it would point to a specific man, mentioned before, which the French sentence does not mean.

for this sentence to mean "he must accept his..." the French should be "il lui faut accepter..." and even in this case, "she" would be also possible.

July 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZibranAhmed
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Thanks, I was confused about this, too. Makes sense now. Could "la" have been used here too, instead of "sa"?

August 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Yes, because only human beings can be expected to accept "(the) human condition".

August 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/growan

Is this not better translated as "it is necessary to know how to accept your human condition?"

June 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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not better, but certainly not the most concise.

June 26, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lastnightilie
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Why? "Savoir" means "to know" so what is the point of it in this sentence?

November 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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In English, I think that the expression was "One must accept the human condition." or "One must learn to accept the human condition." I was not brave enough to ignore the possessive. I put what I thought DuoLingo would want and I was right.

Here is a search I did that shows that in English it is " accept the human condition." http://us.yhs4.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?p=quote+with+%22accept+the+human+condition%22&hspart=att&hsimp=yhs-att_001&type=att_lego_portal_home

December 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/willijanb

I ignored the possessive, and I was sure they'd count it wrong. I was pleased with DL that it was marked correct.

April 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/lpacker
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"One must accept one's human condition" - would this be a correct translation?

April 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelastic

I think so; that is essentially what it's saying, it just sounds a bit too formal in English.

June 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/cosmopolita61
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It is not,I just did that and was wrong because I had forgotten about the savoir. Also,one should accept the human condition as a man,which I missed the first time. I find the translation very unnatural and am going to report

April 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/TechnoBlack

What does this mean exactly? Is this an idiom?

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/thatboysofly

Isn't "sa" his / her / it / it's and not your?

July 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelastic

See the discussions above; in this sentence it literally means 'one's' in 'one must accept one's human condition' but since that sounds kind of formal in English, we often translate such general sentences with 'you' and 'your'.

And just as a side note on English, "it's" with an apostrophe always means "it is" or "it has"; you're thinking of "its" (without the apostrophe) meaning "belonging to it".

July 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/VL594
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So why not "our human condition"?

May 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruno_Zhao

who could tell me what is the meaning “human condition” is it just mean one's physical or life condition?

December 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"la condition d'homme/humaine" has been a huge matter for philosophers and writers for centuries. Very briefly, it has to do with life, death, conscience, fate...

December 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruno_Zhao

o merci

December 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/SuzanneNussbaum

I really object to the sound of "your human condition," and was happy that DL accepted "one's condition as a man" here. I found it impossible to translate the other, similar sentence (with "ta condition") in this lesson; it was easier to work with the (unnatural) possessive here since it was in the generic, 3rd person form.

It's "the" human condition, which all of us share...

August 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Kulg
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it kept telling me I was wrong for saying "he must accept" instead of "one must accept" How can I tell the difference?

June 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mckimjan

The first word, "il", is part of "il faut" which translates as "it is necessary". There is no "he".

August 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharon884224

It told me He must accept his man's condition is right answer, strange. I think I used one or he must know to accept the male condition, which I know translates awkwardly but sounded the most literal. I guess it's an expression that doesn't translate literally.

October 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"Il faut" never, ever translates to "he must".

"Il faut" is impersonal, like "it is necessary", where "il" and "it" do not represent anyone or anything.

October 30, 2018
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