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  5. "उसके पैरों को क्या चाहिए?"

"उसके पैरों को क्या चाहिए?"

Translation:What do her legs want?

July 21, 2018

51 Comments


[deactivated user]

    This is just a weird sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jason292109

    I agree. This lesson had a several sentences, where I thought, no English speaking person would ever say this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iChandan

    Or no Hindi speaker either


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VishBhai

    Say what? I guess the only answer can be dance.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VIJAYRAMPE1

    I am grateful to Duolingo for this wonderful course.....but simply put this sentence is awful. What's worse is that I got the correct answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vyX2dK6g

    me too... how bizarre.. but we must be learning if it works


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

    I guess 'need' is more logical here, but that's not always the case with Duolingo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atikagellama

    this reminds me of a indian horror story i read when i was a child about a guy's hand being possed. the possessed hand would have its own mind and would want to eat/take other people's hands.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carissa789117

    There was an episode of Tales from the Crypt like that. Hands were cutting themselves off. I remember the episode ended with a woman cutting her nose off "to spite her face."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vargasjuk

    this reminds me of a funny russian idiom: when someone does something randomly, russians call that "according to the itching of the left heel"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hakimomatata

    vipassana practitioner, anyone?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pussitrash

    I am officially confused


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean666615

    Lol I agree this is a weird sentence


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agape1327

    His legs want to be independent? Dance? Wear stockings? no wax?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EthanJose10

    Something else, maybe


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_decca_

    What on earth does this mean? So confused, this sentence makes no sense in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheModerateMan

    Makes me think of some dialects of English where "want" can mean "need." "That wall wants paint. That laundry wants washing." So, perhaps his legs want trousers.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plastoquinone

    Is this an idiom or something? lol


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barb.Young

    Took a wild guess and tried “What do his feet need?”, that was accepted too!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Navy195713

    Same here! such a weird sentence though....


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fH6lclhu

    A native Urdu speaker here trying to learn Hindi script: Not only your translation is absolutely incorrect, you should have accepted my translation. "What do her feet need." Feet and legs are anatomically and generally two different things. Feet पैरों are not legs टांग Being a medical doctor LEG can never be used for a foot. LEG is something ABOVE the ankle and is certainly not a foot.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ihavelonghair

    Thank you fH6lclhu for the context, I was wondering how to differentiate between foot and leg. Now to make sure I don't confuse टांग and tongue!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fH6lclhu

    :) :) But to make is clearer, टांग is more like tAAng and is a bit different than tongue.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juhani.juurik

    Given that many modern Indians go back and forth between Hindi and English in mid sentences it might get pretty coufusing still.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MamaLloyd

    Thank you fH6lclhu. I knew there had to be a word for feet, and another word for legs, but Duo has never bothered to use both words correctly. Makes me crazy, and makes me think there's something wrong with Hindi. No, it's just Duo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzyKulshr

    My husband is a Hindi speaker from MP and says they use the same word for feet and legs. Perhaps it's a regional thing?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyoCobran

    "I'm your Venus, I'm your fire, your desire...Nair for men."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Satya_G

    This sentence makes no sense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seikblu

    Well, at least I'll be ready to have a conversation about autonomous legs in Hindi


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nina427848

    Maybe he's playing footsie under the table ;)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jyoti868659

    L O L I agree this is a weird sentence


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirilMladenov

    Why is 'ko' required in the sentence?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92
    Mod
    • 1355

    The subject should be in the dative case when used with चाहिए. For nouns, this means we have to use them with the postposition को.

    The literal translation of the sentence would be 'To his feet, what is needed?'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/capmagn

    Quite useful


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juhani.juurik

    I don't know.. I'm appreciating these kinds of quirky Duolingo sentences less and less... at first it seemed like fun and cute approach, but now it starts to feel more like waste of time.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jared881746

    If this sentence pertained to real life instead of bizarroworld, I could learn much faster.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/labani

    This made me miss all those cute and interesting sentences in spanish course, especially those involving animals. Those also made it easy to remember. Even comments were funny. Now a days all i see is boring plain sentences. Seriously what happened to duo and crowd :(


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grijota69

    i dont understand this ufff


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SambaSiva7

    Pairom means feet


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M_A_Ashraf

    I love these bizarre, crazy but grammatically correct sentences. Theses sentences make you want to understand the underlying mechanisms in a language.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ruby140028

    How do you know it's her and not him


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vinay92
    Mod
    • 1355

    You don't. It can be either 'her' or 'him'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VivekGanta

    "What is needed to his legs" marked as wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dayakara

    If we were to go back a few centuries, this sentence would not be so weird. In early modern English, that is in Shakespeare's English, "want' regularly means "need" or "lack", while "will" usually means modern "want". There was a semantic shift. We still have fossilized expressions like "living in want" or "We got lost for want of a map." I've decided to shift back to an earlier form of English to understand this sentence. Someone is directing this question at a doctor. 'What treatment do her legs need.'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColleenTotten

    This is an inappropriate sentence. It is a sentence no one would ever actually say and has a sexual undertone towards women. Please remove this sentence from your lesson plan.

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