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How to Remember What Suffix to Use in Spanish.

When I'm doing these Duolingo courses, I find it really hard to memorize what suffix to use in each scenario.

I know the -o in como means that it's pointing to me, but I find the other ones more hard to remember and set them up in my head, like "this is for this" and "that is for that".

Can anyone help or give a resource? I feel that if I figure this out I'll be better with my Spanish learning, and have more motivation, for I can remember this stuff, and if I can I can remember more Spanish stuff as well.

Thanks a bunch for your help! I appreciate it!

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3 weeks ago
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5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FuzzyAslan

Irritating, isn't it? : ) A different ending for yourself, talking to someone, talking about someone, groups you're in, groups over there, on and on. You know there's a pattern; it's just so difficult to get.

The internet is FULL of verb conjugation charts, and they all do the same thing to me: they make my eyes glaze over, thinking, 'That's a lot of stuff -- I'll never get it!'

So what I've done is make my own charts. . .not all at once, though! I just have a few headers -- me, you, he/she, they, etcetera, and then, as I go along and see new verb endings, I place them in the proper columns. After a while, I'll discover the pattern myself, and think 'Aha! So that's how it works!' And it's that flash of sudden understanding that sticks in my head, and doesn't go away.

I never finish the charts, by the way -- they would get too big. I'll just make a new one when I get bogged down with new conjugations. Besides, once that flash happens, you can pretty much make an educated guess on what the ending should be for a new verb, and most of the time, you'll be right!

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Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b05aplmun.ca
b05aplmun.ca
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There are three basic verb conjugation patterns in Spanish (for -ar, -er, and -ir verbs), plus some irregular verbs. Look here for the three standard conjugation patterns and some of the irregular verbs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_conjugation.

You´ll need, eventually, to memorize the patterns, whether by reviewing the sentences or by writing out the different conjugations over and over again or by just sitting down and reading them again and again until it sticks.

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Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
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Maybe flashcards with "yo" in one side and "-o" in another. Regular verbs have three patterns, according to their endings in infinitive (the name of the verb). But -er and -ir verbs follow almost the same pattern. I.e.: tú cantas (cantar) tú comes (comer) and tú víves (vivir), nosotros cantamos, nosotros comemos, nosotros vivimos.

Search for a verb conjugator and write down the endings of cantar, comer and vivir or other regular verbs. This regular pattern is followed by thousands of verbs.

Unfortunately, you'll need to learn irregular verbs in packs or one by one (ser, ir, saber).

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Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mattw0699

Every time I encounter a new (or forgotten) word in Duolingo I put into a Quizlet.com vocab set. For verbs, I fully conjugate the standard form from memory. Then I use http://conjugator.reverso.net to check my conjugation. It didn't take long for me to have the standard conjugations down. Also, when I see the English word I then have to write out the full conjugation in Spanish.

0
Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clarkj0
clarkj0
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Try the "The Concise Red Book of Spanish Verbs"

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0071761047/

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Reply3 weeks ago