"तुम दवाई खाते हो ।"

Translation:You eat medicine.

July 21, 2018

48 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam362597

While I can see this is a direct translation, in English one generally 'takes' medicine, so that would be a more natural translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sninguistics

In fact, I've never heard दवाई खाना as an expression either, but rather दवाई लेना. Admittedly my experience is more with Andhra Hindi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fH6lclhu

A native Urdu speaker here learning Hindi script: I agree, inasmuch as Duolingo insists on proper English translation, eating medicine is not only improper English, I have never heard of eating medicine in either Hindi or Urdu. Lena is the verb for taking medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artikyulet

Thanks! That was exactly what I wondered. If that's the case for most Hindi and Urdu speakers, why are we learning a sentence that makes no damn sense in either Hindustani or English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Perhaps some of the course creators are L2 English and L2 Hindi?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hamad839630

Also native Urdu & Hindi speaker, and I have heard people say 'eat (khao) / drink (piyo) medicine' in Urdu and Hindi. Also heard 'take (lo) medicine' which, yes, is more frequently used. I wouldn't say that one is more correct over the other. But yes, agreed that in English I've only encountered 'taking medicine' not really 'eating medicine'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dayakara

Thanks for your clarity!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guenter212784

This is interesting; so there would not be a difference between English and Hindi usage (and also in German, e.g., one "takes" a medicine).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam362597

It's interesting how many things are 'taken' in Hindi though. Rest, tension etc....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Compean

Are there areas in AP where Hindi is more common than Telugu? Or by "Andhra Hindi" do you just mean the Hindi that you learned in school?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BTSARMY.INDIAN

Andhra hindi! I am from Andhra toooo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustusRobi3

I agree. In English we normally say take, not eat, medicine. Same thing in Chinese; they say "chi yao", literally "eat medicine".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John335027

'take' still not accepted (as of 2020-03-04) Very frustrating :( Otherwise very happy with this course


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

It's only partially direct translation. They changed the order of the words and translated each word but didn't make it into what English speakers say. Why the mishmash of Hindi and English instead of full English? Is the Hindi in this course also full of English traces that I can't notice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Olexsa
  • 2744

Some ayurvedic herbal medicines are eaten with a spoon.
ALT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brianl

No, they are taken with a spoon.

A lot of children's medicines in the US are taken by spoon as well, because small children can't swallow pills. The word is always "take," not "eat" or "drink."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barb.Young

Gotta go eat an aspirin, this program is giving me a headache...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tre_mojosa

I too love to eat fever medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ72T

Is this natural sounding in Hindi? Could you also use the verb लेना ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emrys29

Yes, it sounds natural. However, "lete ho" would also work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VIJAYRAMPE1

India's traditional Ayurveda has many edible medicines like Chyavanaprasha....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brianl

This is a question about the English language. It has nothing to do with India's traditional Ayurveda.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VIJAYRAMPE1

The lifeways of a culture is always reflected in its language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gogia16

Yes but when speaking about the English translation, it should not be translated literally, but translated so it makes sense to a native speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

In the lifeways of English speakers we "take" medicine, we never "eat" medicine. So in this case the reflection is terrible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umi298937

Come on wake up duolingo. A translation needs to be correct in the language it’s being translated into. You do but eat medicine in English. You take medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umi298937

In English you take medicine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dayakara

Yes! if दवाई खाना is the or a usual expression of the idea in Hindi then दवाई खाना means "take medicine. "Tengo hambre" doesn't mean " I have hunger" it means "I am hungry" . У меня книга doesn't mean "By me book". It means "I have a book." We translate meaning, not words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolineQu832658

I also feel that although we take medicine by mouth, we are not eating it.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoydipChak1

You don't 'eat' medicine. You 'take' medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LinguisticBoi

it should be take medicine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karim562886

As pointed out before, eating medicine isn't correct in English, though correct in Hindi or Urdu!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/holdredial

There was an early 19th century autobiography called "Confessions of an English Opium-Eater". So at some point it may have been correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OJFord

Probably that was recreational though.

Some people like to eat cannabis products, but if it's medicinal it's 'taken'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger423959

I have known many opium eaters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielFono1

Sounds like something you say to a drug addict


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ansumann10

I take medicine but I don't eat medicine।


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BassdayeSa1

I've heard this before but still sounds weird!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BassdayeSa1

Such improper english!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VIJAYRAMPE1

I eat Chyvanprasha every day


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babu993092

You eat me, is probably just as good


[deactivated user]

    Nobody ever "eats" medecine ever!!! Please change this nonsense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RADHIKA108

    I thought 'you eat medicine' seemed strange but then was reminded that before the modern medicine which we TAKE, we had herbs as medicine which we would drink or EAT. so the sentence then makes sense.


    [deactivated user]

      We would still take the medicine regardless of what shape or form it came in!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gita-ji

      "Let food be thy medicine." — ancient proverb

      Learn Hindi in just 5 minutes a day. For free.