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  5. "Bonne semaine !"

"Bonne semaine !"

Translation:Have a good week!

March 27, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Persikov

Is this a thing in French, like "Have a good week!" in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P-Brain

I can confirm that "Have a good week" was accepted as a correct translation (and I believe it's the most accurate English equivalent to this statement)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

Exactly. Just like "Bonne journée" = have a good day. "Bonne soirée" = Have a good evening, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Persikov

I'm almost certain that the accepted translation has changed in the two years since a made my comment - as it wouldn't make any sense with the current one ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

The example translation currently on the Android app is "Good week!", whereas on the website it's "Have a good week!" (In fact just now on the app I was required to enter "good week" for a put-the-words-in-order question, not "have a good week".)

This sort of discrepancy remains common on Duolingo.

(Some of the questions on the Android app don't even show an example translation at the top of the discussion page.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

I think I may have discovered why (it's subtle) and rendered a fix. Let me know if you see it again. It takes a day or so for the system to reset so give it until next week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

@Roger The app version is a different animal entirely it seems. "Have a good week" is the standard English for this kind of thing, along with "Bonne journée" (have a good day), Bonne dimanche (have a good Sunday), etc. Having said that, staff (not moderators) are making their own changes to translations and "good week" has been stricken from the list. "Good week" is quite literal, but does not seem natural/idiomatic, IMO. Perhaps that is their new thinking on the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Kierz_

why feminine not masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

It's only because the noun "semaine" is feminine. It's not because it's part of a pattern.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Kierz_

D'accord merci!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjtischer

It's phrases like this that make learning another language worthwhile - to think I lived my entire life without knowing to wish anyone a "good week!" - what a life, friends, what a desolate life


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaB_Duolingo

Oh, dear! Oh, là là! Courage, ma chère MJT. Bonne semaine!

Your turn. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjtischer

Bonne semaine et bonne dimanche!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Here's another option: "Passe/Passez une bonne semaine".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qiset1
  • 1482

So what is wrong with a literal transation? I.e. "good week"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/funky4lyf

Isn't a better translation, "Great week!" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

In typical English, it would be "Have a..." nice week. It's along the same order as "bonne soirée", have a good/nice evening, "bonne journée" have a good/nice day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aidanfrance

who says "good week"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

In English, we say "have a good week" but there is no "have a" in the French. Just like "bonne journée" means "have a nice day". We have definitely moved beyond the word-for-word translation stage of learning French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnMorgan833858

so apparently "Good week!" is wrong, despite that being the literal grammatical translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

Hi, John. Right. Literal/yes. Natural/no. And I really don't know people who go around saying "Good week" to others. The meaning of the French is "Have a good week!" Just like "Bonne anniversaire" is "Happy Birthday" (even though it doesn't say "happy") and "Bonne année !" is "Happy New Year" even though there is no "happy" and no "new". This may seem a bit odd but we must recognize the idea that French expressions are to be translated into natural English expressions which convey the same meaning. It is very often true that literal translations are just....well, odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A-soup-can

Well, it makes an interesting greeting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs

It's not a greeting, but perhaps something you might say (on parting) to someone whom you will not see until the next weekend.

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