"मैं एक घंटे से खा रहा हूँ "

Translation:I am eating since an hour.

July 22, 2018

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AJ72T

Although I understand the construction, and it's similarity to the French 'je mange depuis une heure', in English it is appropriate to use the past tense, 'I have been eating for an hour'.

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mah_gel

Some people have pointed out that it's somewhat common in Indian English, but nonetheless Duo should accept other constructions from other varieties of English.

November 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken384225

This is not English. Either “I have been eating for an hour” or “I have been eating since an hour ago”

July 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam362597

I agree with AJ72T. Regarding 'since', it can be used with a specific time or date, albeit still with the present perfect continuous tense - eg. 'I have been eating since 2pm' - but a duration requires the use of 'for'.

July 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael42164

1) I agree with the others: The English here is incorrect. 2) As stated by JamesTWils below, there is a glitch that often prevents reports from selecting all possible types of errors.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleKey

Frustrating to see so many clearly ungrammatical English sentences throughout the course. They should edit these more thoroughly.

July 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken384225

Hey it’s a community effort and we can all contribute to making it work better. :)

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

We could, if the report function included "The English sentence is unnatural or has an error," but I only saw "there are problems with the audio," "the pull down translations are wrong or missing," and "The Hindi sentence is wrong or has an error." I did not even see "My answer should be accepted." Consequently, the developers have not allowed the users the typical methods for helping to improve the course.

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ccf-Uk

I’d recommend reporting the hints as they seem to be wrong for this sentence. That’s what I’ve been doing at least.

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sam362597

There aren't that many, and a lot of them are standard Indian-English, and it's in beta. It takes time (unpaid time at that) and a lot of reporting to iron out mistakes and get all the acceptable answers into the system - Duo courses are always a work in progress.

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

They are indeed, and, like everyone else here, I am sure, I am extremely grateful to the Hindi team, who have helped me finally crack devanagari. I assume they choose which report functions are offered, though, and they really need to include "the 'correct' answer is wrong or unnatural, if they want to continue to improve this wonderfully useful course.

September 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/bhasanova

The thing here is that this is a very Indian English seeming sentence. So it is English - but most people learning Hindi wouldn't say it!

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/J.Compean

The point isn't to learn correct English, but rather correct Hindi. Duolingo does this by asking us to Translate sentence, not Interpret them. Accepting looser interpretations of the Hindi sentences wouldn't actually help us.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielKnow8

I see Duolingo is trying to teach us to speak English like Indians, not just Hindi...

November 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EqDnxfRw

English does not use this construction - incorrect grammar

July 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/VIJAYRAMPE1

The intent of this sentence is, " I have now been eating for an hour." Or, "I have spent an hour eating". Lessons provided give us the Hindi construction of a sentence. Often it will not translate precisely to the English equivalent or to that of any other language. Accepting this reality has made the process interesting rather than frustrating.

September 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

Except that, if a student is told that "I have been eating for an hour" is wrong, then he learns that this is not the proper Hindi way to convey that concept. The student is left with a sentence he has learned in Hindi, but which translates nothing of any meaning. This is why actually usable sentences in the target language should always be accepted.

November 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jose.Leitao

I completely agree.

November 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/brianl

How do I tell if it's "I am eating since an hour" or "I am eating for an hour"? I feel like I've seen both. Is there a difference in the Hindi that I'm not seeing?

(I agree with everyone else that this isn't grammatical English.)

January 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

Duo should realize that many here trying to learn Hindi are not native English speakers and that glaring solecisms such as this one are confusing.

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/VedantHari

This is a pretty bad translation; it should be I am eating since an hour ago

May 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/J.Compean

But the word "ago" does not appear in the Hindi sentence. So how would your version be better?

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

That's not good either. It would have to be "I have been eating since an hour ago." I am eating refers to the present moment or a future intention. Not part of the past.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/J.Compean

That introduces a different tense than the original sentence, so it's still not a good translation.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/VIJAYRAMPE1

No language is constructed to have an exact construction phrasing in another. Apart from the literal translation, we need to garner a sense of what the sentence means. The world of languages need not bend to the particulars of the English language.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

Precisely, no language will be constructed in the same way as any other, which is why, when translating from one language to another, one cannot translate precisely word for word. One must find the construction that conveys the meaning of the sentence in the source language into a new sentence in the target language. If one does not, then one gets the sort of sentence one sees in English above. It clearly does not mean what the sentence in Hindi does, because while the Hindi sentence clearly means something, the English sentence means absolutely nothing. It therefore teaches me absolutely nothing about the Hindi language, except that this sequence of words is a possibility.

July 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/eik55

The translation is incorrect plain and simple. We are here to learn Hindi, not Indian English. Indian English, by the way, has many incorrect sentence structures. So stop justifying this like we should all accept this. It's just straight up wrong.

November 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

And...any educated Indian would not write sentences like this in English. I appreciate that some of those composing these translation may not be proficient in standard English. However, to make this course work, they need to have their sentences vetted by someone who is.

July 18, 2019
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