"Le journal date d'hier."

Translation:The newspaper dates from yesterday.

March 27, 2013

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tom921
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This is how it would be said in English: "yesterday's newspaper. You need a literal symbol for the translation to tell what is to be done.

March 27, 2013

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It is a very strangely worded question. The closest sentence in English that made sense to me was "Yesterday's newspaper."

January 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/blrsar
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Yes!

February 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Reavenk
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The literal translation seems like acceptable English to me. The main problem is that "Yesterday's newspaper" is a thing, it's not a sentence with a verb. If I asked you "what was so special about that newspaper?", would it sound more natural to answer "It dates from yesterday", or "Yesterday's newspaper"? Yesterday's newspaper what?

February 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"it is yesterday's newspaper" = "c'est le journal d'hier"

March 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ozzychris
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I said 'the newspaper dated yesterday' which is acceptable English I would have thought. The translation of 'the newspaper's dated yesterday' is a little pedantic

June 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/couchdoor
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I would argue 'the paper's date is yesterday' is also a possible translation.

December 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/blrsar
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I agree!

February 21, 2014
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