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  5. "यह जूलिया है।"

"यह जूलिया है।"

Translation:This is Julia.

July 25, 2018

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fH6lclhu

Once again the correct translation of the audio should be "Here is Julia." NOT..... This is Julia. While the यह जूलिया है does mean ...This is Julia...the audio is a translation of यहाँ जूलिया है


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John.Polyglot

I think you are right to my knowledge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NamamiSaha

But in hindi यह means this, not here. यहा‌ means here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pn4Cj

Yaha means this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rohit349192

But yaha means this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crimson345

'यह' means 'this' whereas 'यहाँ' means 'here'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edwardfarnum

The audio is fine for me. It does have the funny stilted yaha sound rather than commonly pronounced yeh, but it sure isn’t saying yahã.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pirateofceg

Shouldnt this is julia be ye Julia he, instead of yaha Julia he. Yaha is more about the where than the who right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edwardfarnum

the spelling here is correct is absolutely correct. The words yaha and vaha (all with the inherent short a, not the long -that is the last character in each is the h) are commonly pronounced yeh and vo (although not here on duolingo, which uses the formal written pronunciation). the “where” word has a long a at the end, with a nasal dot over it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sb53534

I'm a native speaker of Hindustani and never once in my entire life have I heard anyone on either side of the border say yaha or waha instead of yeh and woh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrishtiRoy8

Hello fellow native Hindustani speaker. I am a native Hindi speaker. And formally pronunciation of यह/वह with the ह is actually the correct pronunciation. ये/वो is a result of colloquially spoken hindi and it is informal. Only recently is it accepted formally. When we are taught वाक्य अशुद्धि शोधन (correct the incorrect sentences) we are taught about these little things. You all can go try those out online they are readily available it will make your hindi more refined once you learn basic sentences. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex.Essilfie

I'm not a Hindi speaker so I can't say for sure if it's truly the case in Hindi.

However, in many languages, there's a variant spoken mainly in informal contexts that differs very slightly from the formal, written version. Maybe this is also the case with Hindi where the informal spoken variant is slightly different from the formal written form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex.Essilfie

So the pronunciation of the name is like ju•li•ya instead of ju•lia?
Is this due to the alphabet used or it's actually how the name is usually pronounced by Hindi speakers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertBeck195168

Ju li ya vs ju lia also comes up in different areas of america. So its not just a hindi thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex.Essilfie

I see. I have only ever heard it pronounced as Ju•lia everywhere I've been to (UK, NL, DE, GH, KEN) so this new pronunciation sounded a bit different to me. Interesting to know that it's not specific to Hindi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmileAndMoveOn

—the way Hindi is spoken , it's .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teboton

In english it is "this is julia" why is it "this julia is" in hindi? also there are some unique -symbols-, I must call them, that show in words like सेब. The ending symbol is totally different and not in the lessons that I went over. HELP


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Because the Hindi verb is at the end of the sentence. Structure: SOV.

The letters: the Hindi script is called Devanagari.
If you mean "।" by the ending symbol, it's an Hindi full stop, a "."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustusRobi3

Mnemonic that यह (yeha) means 'this' and वह (vaha) means 'that' rather than vice versa: English this contains a high front vowel, while the Hindi equivalent begins with said vowel's semivowel counterpart: [j] (i am using the International Phonetic Alphabet [IPA] symbol); commonly romanized as "y".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I didn't get it, but I will memorize yeha = this, and vaha = that.
With this help: There are more "a" in "vaha" like in "that".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krisbaudi

Why is Julia written in Hindi with ya at the end, instead of ia? Is is needed between the two consonants i and a? Is there a rule, that a consonant has to be between two vowels?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Learner_Patel12

it has to do with the pronunciation "Ju-li-ya" is how it is spelt with the sounds so therefore "ya" instead of "ia"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiSaluja

I didnt consider it a spelling mistake i meant for typing

It was a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiSaluja

I mean we did a typo we me kai saluja! you better give me a lingot for accusing! lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I_m_fine_bts_

This is Julia यह जूलिया है


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaiSaluja

You should give "it was a typo" in report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.fxd3Pm

My 3friends wrote That is Julia that is correct, but i wrote same that is wrong What is this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.NoHlWw

Going wrong somewhere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.E8SxNV

This is julia you are right

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