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"Yo conocí a muchos estudiantes ingleses."

Translation:I met many English students.

2 months ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/redbec

"I knew many English students" is also incorrect

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvergato
tvergato
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"Yo conocí" often means "I met," but can also mean "I knew," depending on the context. I think your answer should be marked correct. Did you report it?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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I just reported it again. It should be accepted!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howabunga

Think of it as "I got to know many English students"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZhangtheGreat
ZhangtheGreat
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Just reported it again.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvergato
tvergato
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When you accidentally mix up "conocí" and "cociné" and really think they said "I cooked many English students"...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unapersona37

May someone please elaborate on whether this means 'students studying english' or 'students based in England'?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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English student (studying English) = estudiante de inglés
English student (from England) = estudiante inglés

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvergato
tvergato
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Just like in the English language, "English students" could mean multiple things. You would have to use the context of the conversation to figure out which one they mean. :-)

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warren.Gunther

I said: "I knew a lot of English Students" This is correct. There is no other context to suggest that "met" is the only correct answer.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvergato
tvergato
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No, there are many Spanish verbs that change meaning in the preterite form. This site gives a good overview. https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/verbs-that-change-meaning-in-the-preterite Also, if you have the book 501 Spanish Verbs, you can read about it there.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debbos1
debbos1
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Who knew? A lingot for this revelation and the link.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redbec

"I know many English students" is wrong. Anyone know why? 12.8.18

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvergato
tvergato
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"yo conocí" is past tense

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndesSky

I wonder if 'got to know' is the meaning here?

Thanks if anyone could please clarify.

IMO: In English (UK), 'met', 'got to know' and 'knew' have different meanings.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karen69472
Karen69472
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I totally agree. In my former Spanish courses apart from Duolingo with physical native teachers I learned the word "concocer" in the sense of "kennen" and/or "kennenlernen". These German words are alike to the English "to get to know" and "to know". And of course these translations have different meaning to "to meet s.b.". "to meet s.b." was taught to our mentioned courses as "encontrarse con alguién" or "quedar con alguién" or "reunirse con algién" or some other translations more. But never was it translated with "conocer".

Throughout all my languages I am repeatedly surprised about the differences of validities between the different Duolingo language branches. This though I know that the Spanish/English branch is mainly made for and managed by North- and Latin Americans ...

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debbos1
debbos1
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Duo was developed and written in the US so naturally US English was used to begin with. It is a bit irritating at first for non US English speakers, but I have been impressed with Duo's willingness to expand its English translations to common usage in other parts of the English speaking world.

That must make things very confusing for non-native speakers though. I am in absolute awe of anyone who can learn L1 taught in L2 when their native language is neither.

Having first studied castellano, I was also somewhat miffed at the latino style Spanish. But again, Duo was written in the US which has a common border with Mexico and is more connected in geographical and other ways with S. America than with Spain.

English came from England and Spanish came from Spain but by far the largest number of native English speakers now live in N. America, and by far the largest number of native Spanish speakers live in S. America. There are quite a few native Spanish speakers in the US too!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndesSky

Ah! That clears up 'encontrarse' too. I thought of 'encounter' when I encountered this word :-) But yes I'll keep flexible and listen out how people from different areas use them. Thank you.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debbos1
debbos1
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  1. Yes, I know (conozco) Juan.

  2. I met him (lo conocí)* at a party where a mutual friend introduced us but we just said hi.

  3. Later I got to know (conocer muy bien?) him when we played on the same football team.

  4. Just recently we arranged to meet (quedar, reunirse, encontrarse) to catch up.

Note: some English speakers might say 'got to know' instead of 'met' in 2. and 'got to know him better' or similar in 3.

*See post from tvergato above and check out the link.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndesSky

Thank You! That's very clear. And many thanks to all others on this topic too. Real treasures.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hjh788272

Try using the link provided by tvergato above. In the preterite, conocer changes from 'knew' to 'met'. I found it helpful.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fripzi
Fripzi
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i knew many english students

should be correct

1 week ago