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"Ella tiene que despertarse temprano."

Translation:She has to wake up early.

1 month ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mojavejeeper

"Get up" and "wake up" are synonymous in my world.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Owlspotting
Owlspotting
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Not necessarily: A sleepwalker gets up without waking up, and Garfield wakes up without getting up."

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

Levantarse = get up ~ Despertarse= wake up. :)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mindejo
Mindejo
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I agree with the specific definition but people use them synonymously.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maite654805
Maite654805
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When you're learning a language it's important to notice the differences in the meanings of the words. There are a lot of contexts in which you could replace both expressions without meaning changes, but in other contexts it will not be possible to exchange these words at all.

Pongo esta frase como ejemplo: Me he despertado a las 6:30, pero no me he levantado hasta las 7:00, que ha sonado el despertador.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanMartillo
RyanMartillo
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Same here, I reported it.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KenBarclay

I said "She has to awaken early." Marked wrong. I don't know why.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Maite654805
Maite654805
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I think you should report it. Wake up perhaps is used more often and also in more colloquial contexts. But I cannot think of another word for despertar to use it in more formal or poetic contexts, you would also use despertar to translate awaken.

3 weeks ago