"You pull up the blanket."

Translation:Tu tiri su la coperta.

3/28/2013, 11:15:08 AM

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nickice96

Why not "Tiri sulla coperta" ?

3/28/2013, 11:15:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/royastar

"tirare su" means "to pull up" in this instance, 'su' does not mean 'on,' so it cannot be paired with 'la' to create 'sulla'

6/10/2013, 2:50:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
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So 'Tira mi su' actually means 'pull me up'?

12/15/2016, 9:09:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jordy
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Awesome. Wikipedia: ”Tiramisu (from the Italian language, spelled tiramisù [tiramiˈsu], meaning "pick me up", "cheer me up" or "lift me up") is a popular coffee-flavoured Italian dessert. It is made of ladyfingers dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of eggs, sugar, and mascarpone cheese, flavoured with cocoa."

12/27/2017, 7:52:10 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Margaret_S

This could be an excellent way to remember it! Thanks!

1/17/2017, 8:13:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/fernandoarg
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Does it mean that the prepositions of phrasal verbs in Italian are not paired with the articles?. Can you give me a link of phrasal verbs in Italian?. Thanks.

8/26/2014, 9:13:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/lucianadleme

I'm also interested in some reference about phrasal verbs in Italian. Anyone?

9/7/2015, 7:16:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/marygbaker

Is it wrong to allow words between tirare and su? So, is "tiri il coperto su" wrong?

11/21/2014, 4:48:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/PedroCarne10

Lacks explanation and more examples

4/12/2018, 12:17:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TanyaBella76

I thought 'su' meant 'on'?

4/7/2017, 6:52:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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Prepositions do not translate one-to-one between languages, neither in meaning nor in usage.

5/27/2017, 10:54:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Stergi3
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Which verbs are considered as phrasal verbs in Italian?

10/24/2017, 11:36:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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Not sure what you mean by "phrasal verbs" - In Spanish, I see it used in connection with "phrasal future" = ir a [infinitive] = *going to [infinitie]"

In Italian, there are three modal verbs that I know of:
Dovere - "to have to, must"
Potere - "to be able to, can"
Volere - "to want to*

potere is the one that gives me the most problems, especially in the past tense, where it means "could/might".

12/1/2017, 3:34:16 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
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GoogleTranslate lists a whole slew of uses for su:

adverb on, up, on top of

preposition on, about, out, over, in, up, at, upon, on to, against

12/1/2017, 3:39:28 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/vadrouilleuse

e perché no "tu tiri sulla coperta" ????

1/20/2018, 9:30:05 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
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Your question is answered in the top comment on this page.

1/20/2018, 4:09:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ks4FQ

The verb riprendere is to pull up, in my dictionary. Why use the verb tirare.

3/9/2018, 1:59:00 PM
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