"You pull up the blanket."

Translation:Tu tiri su la coperta.

March 28, 2013

72 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nickice96

Why not "Tiri sulla coperta" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/royastar

"tirare su" means "to pull up" in this instance, 'su' does not mean 'on,' so it cannot be paired with 'la' to create 'sulla'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

So 'Tira mi su' actually means 'pull me up'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jordy

Awesome. Wikipedia: ”Tiramisu (from the Italian language, spelled tiramisù [tiramiˈsu], meaning "pick me up", "cheer me up" or "lift me up") is a popular coffee-flavoured Italian dessert. It is made of ladyfingers dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of eggs, sugar, and mascarpone cheese, flavoured with cocoa."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeannech

Amazing explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuaneBue

yum tutto bene


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duke_of_Earle

This bit of culture is worth knowing. I've had the dessert, and dislike it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattQuattr

Awww..I love it And it does pick me up :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret_S

This could be an excellent way to remember it! Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

Or it could be the imperative...

But yes, I assume the original meaning of the name of the dessert would imply that the dessert pulls me up, so 'it'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doriansje

And why is "tiri la coperta su" wrong? I thought in analogy with "tira mi su"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ion1122

Well, "la coperta" is a noun, and "mi" is a pronoun. In Italian, the word order when a pronoun is object can be different from when a noun is object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacqueline814483

I thought Tira-mi-su was a dessert!!! haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fernandoarg

Does it mean that the prepositions of phrasal verbs in Italian are not paired with the articles?. Can you give me a link of phrasal verbs in Italian?. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucianadleme

I'm also interested in some reference about phrasal verbs in Italian. Anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaWolfie

I had the same question. I plan to Google it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coach123321

So what does the 'su' mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattQuattr

Tiri su together means pull up Sulla means on the a a description of where something is located. Tiri su is a verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacqueline814483

I thought Tiri su was an Italian dessert!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annamanzara

It accepted "tu tiri sulla coperta" for me (June 2021)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxVanHeme

9/3/22: tu tiri sulla coperta was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica

Please report it when you can: that's wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marygbaker

Is it wrong to allow words between tirare and su? So, is "tiri il coperto su" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHN04

If 'tira mi su' is right why is 'tiri la coperta su' wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

Nouns and pronouns can't necessarily go in the same place. Like in English, you say "Pull it up" but not "Pull up it". Same thing here. The pronoun comes before the preposition, but the noun comes after.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicolaGerardo

Why not "Tiri la coperta su."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

The phrase can't be separated like that. Little pronouns, yes (tira mi su), whole noun phrases, no.

We have a similar but opposite restriction in English. We can say "pull up the blanket" or "pull the blanket up", but we can only say "pull it up" and not "pull up it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guy875337

if tirare is "to pull up" whey is any form of "su" included at all? it is part of the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

It just means "to pull" as far as I know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zimtladen

... also "to throw"...

(but, no, tirare su does not mean "to throw up")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puzzle36714

Was tira just a trick? Why tiri form, everything was singular...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

TIRARE, "to pull", is a regular -are verb.

https://i.imgur.com/8atYu1Y.png

subject pronoun verb stem verb suffix
io tir- -o
tu tir- -i
lui/lei tir- -a
noi tir- -iamo
voi tir- -ate
loro tir- -ano

Putting it together:
io tiro
tu tiri
lui/lei tira
noi tiriamo
voi tirate
loro tirano


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanyaBella76

I thought 'su' meant 'on'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

Prepositions do not translate one-to-one between languages, neither in meaning nor in usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

Yes, and it also means up. Su o giù. Up or down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

Which verbs are considered as phrasal verbs in Italian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ks4FQ
  • 1078

The verb riprendere is to pull up, in my dictionary. Why use the verb tirare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorenzoLM

To learn tirare su

riprendere doesn't seem to mean "pull up" but rather "reclaim" or "get back" or "recover"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WalterZAMB4

I find it difficult to know with verbs that imply two subjects if the verb ending applies to thing doing the pulling or the thing that is being pulled!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

I'm not sure what you mean by "two subjects".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WalterZAMB4

Well I am one subject who is doing the pulling. The other subject is the blanket which is being pulled. To which subject does the verb ending apply. An example of such a verb is piacere, in Italian i can never like something however something can please me. The verb ending on piacere follows what is being liked not what is doing the liking. It becomes difficult to know which verbs have this reversed subject association! So am I pulling the blanket or is the blanket being pulled by me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

No, the blanket is the direct object of the verb, the recipient of the action of the verb. The verb agrees with the only subject there is, which is the one performing the action.

You pull up the blanket.
Who is doing the pulling? You. The subject.
What is being pulled up? The blanket. The direct object.

And yes, "piacere" means "to please", not "to like". This still does not mean there are two subjects, it just means that which one the subject is varies between English and Italian.

English:
I like elephants.
"I" is the subject, "elephants" is the direct object.
Who is experiencing the feeling of liking something? "I".
What is the object of my feelings? "Elephants".

Italian:
Mi piacciono gli elefanti.
Note how it's the object pronoun "mi" and not the subject pronoun "io". The subject is "gli elefanti".
The elephants please me.
What is doing the pleasing? "The elephants".
Who is being pleased? "Me".

It sounds to me like you're confusing "subject" with "noun".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshOwO

Thanks, that helps a LOT! You earned a lingot. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParisTheLoris

This reminds me of when I learnt what the name of the Italian dessert, Tiramisu, meant. Tira mi su = pull (pick) me up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puzzle36714

So tiri is both pull and throw??

Could this be translated to more like "throw on a blanket"

I guess I was thinking before that when I pull up the blankets, my arms are on top, pulling up. If you were under, and grab them from underneath, in the motion to pull up towards my face is almost like a throwing motion... kinda sorta?? But then the intended meaning makes more sense to me!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laura964337

I used the verb alzare, to raise. Nope.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

Of course not. That says something rather different. Pulling up a blanket means you are covering yourself more fully. Raising a blanket means lifting it vertically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randy662043

If tiri = up,,, why need "su"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jimrae1

Why is tu tira su la coperta not acceptable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zimtladen

Rae.F gives a complete conjugation of the present tense of tirare above. As you will see there, it goes tu tiri and lui/lei tira.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/il3acKPv

why is "su" needed in this phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zimtladen

for the same reason that "up" is needed in the English one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jocelyn.vi1

Why not tirate la coperta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zimtladen

That's "you pull the blanket".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doste572

Why tira mi su, and not mi tira su?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becky889944

But why su? Tu tiri la coperto? You pull up the blanket????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

"Tirare" is "to pull".
"Su" is "up".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spikelvr75

Why is it tiri instead of tira?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

Because that's how verbs conjugate in Italian. Please see my reply to Puzzle36714 above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zimtladen

If the "you" were the formal sort, it could be "Lei tira". Or indeed, if plural, "voi tirate".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 3039

That is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattQuattr

Why do we need su in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RLGuillen

Tu tiri la coperta?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattQuattr

Why not tu tiri su...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate3010

How come the singular tense 'tu' is accepted here for pulling up the blanket, when only the plural 'voi' was accepted for closing the gate DL?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinghao42

Thanks, ' Plus Mod ' for your explanation.

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