"There are cheap stores on the second floor."

Translation:Hay tiendas baratas en el segundo piso.

4 months ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DanFischer1
DanFischer1
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I'm curious why segundo must precede piso in this instance--is it a numerical thing? Anyhow, piso segundo was marked wrong.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chloe654blake

same here

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidBeaumont1

why is 'piso segundo' wrong?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBla391866

Per SpanishDict (https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement), "Limiting adjectives that define a number or amount of a noun, even if it is not specific, come before the noun."

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhfenton
jhfentonPlus
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I believe "Hay tiendas baratas en el primer piso." should be accepted and even preferred. In my experience "el primer piso" is the second floor, not the first floor/ground floor.

At a minimum, this is the universal American usage and should be acknowledged by Duo.

Reported Nov 16, 2018.

4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lesaken
Lesaken
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I still don't think you are being logical. Wouldn't el primer piso therefore still mean "first floor"?

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhfenton
jhfentonPlus
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It's not a question of logic. It's a question of real-world usage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Storey#Latin_American_schemes

In most of Europe, including Spain, and also in Mexico, "el primer piso" is the first floor above "la planta baja."

So what an estadounidense would call the "second floor" would be called "el primer piso" in Spain and Mexico.

Yes, in other Latin American countries, "el primer piso" and "la planta baja" are the same thing, or at least on the same level.

So I believe both numbering systems should be acknowledged in the answers.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lesaken
Lesaken
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I just think it creates a slippery slope to confusion if you want to say segundo piso means "first floor" simply because countries use different labels for things. We are learning Spanish, so I believe you have to go with the Spanish meaning of the words - "second floor", whatever level that happens to be - and mentally make any adjustment, if need be, to suit whatever naming convention maybe used in a given country.

Some countries (generally British Commonwealth I think) drive on the left side of the road, not on the right. But that doesn't change the meaning of "left" and "right". So if a British motor article mentions driving on the left side and you are European you mentally adjust for it.

Otherwise it becomes like Humpty Dumpty (Through the Looking-Glass)

“When I use a word it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”

Which is fine for Humpty, but no one else will understand him.

1 week ago
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