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  5. "Il cuoco ha il burro."

"Il cuoco ha il burro."

Translation:The cook has the butter.

March 28, 2013

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guglielmo.andrew

If the cook is female, will that change the word? "La Cuoca"? Or will it just stay il cuoco regardless of the gender of the actual cook?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

You're right! La cuoca is a female cook.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilyroseoar

yeah that did help thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bexbeth

I so nearly put "the cook has a donkey"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mada8902

This is a funny phase for me :) burro in spanish is donkey ! Yeah my mind is going crazy trying to learn italian from english when my native language is romanian:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleKe310615

Almost the same! But my mother language is portuguese from brazil haha. Here "burro" also means donkey, but it is like an offense. Not the animal. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaguitarioLima

Well , I am a native Spanish speaker, and this is my goal learn a new language from English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisMouz

I got confused by the cook (noun) and cook (verb)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marnie428

yes I think they should have taught us chef instead because I got this wrong thinking cook as a verb!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaguitarioLima

chef is a French word, not Italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marnie428

Chef has origins in french, but was introduced into the english language,capocuoco is the best translation I can find in Italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabfooty1

Cool information


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drunken_Sailor

Also me, I'm not native


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alvaro...Antonio

no way you can mistake cook verb and noun. it wouldn't make any sense as a verb in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manuel3000

it's doesn't have any sense!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bratamoli

I think you misheard it (like I originally did), but it's "IL cuoco" (THE cook), not "IO cuoco." (PS - "I cook" would be "Io cucino.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/letitbealayna

Very helpful clarification. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berriegirl12345

Just so we're clear, Penny doesn't have the butter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneSNas

Can anyone explain if the verb AVERE also means "there to be/ to exist", as in Portuguese? In Brazil we often say things like "HAS a tree in front of my house". (TEM/ HÁ uma árvore em frente a minha casa). Is it the same in Italian? Thanks in advance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stefranz1

You can say "ho un albero di fronte a casa mia", but only in 1st person.

Though, the best sentence would be "c'è un albero di fronte a casa mia". C'è means "There is "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaccf

Il cuoco is the same chef?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laragazza215994

Cuoco is the person that is cooking, in this case it happens to be a man. It's not necessary a chef.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ctanis4

It sounds like "ha il" blends together to almost sound like "I'll" .. maybe a little different.. is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Little.Fairy

it's true! vero, solo la A un po' più forte.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatejMusa

It's doesnt have any sense! this is not logic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaditsingh8

The cook has the donkey XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarlosCampuzano

so, here in this context, what does "cuoco" stands for?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laragazza215994

The one who is cooking, and it's a male m


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fliorelinaaa

I dunno why, but I always think that burro means beer... can someone help me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curious_Soul

Burro means butter, while birra means beer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Evilpaperclip

Could you essentially say "Il cuoco ha burro" ? Does the "il" in il burro actually add anything? I know it means "the", but in the context of the sentence it just makes it confusing.

Following on from that, if it is acceptable to drop the "il" or "la" for this kind of sentence, when is it not acceptable to do so?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aevuh

Big Bang Penny has real last name Cuoco. Kaley Cuoco is it?

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