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  5. "De octubre a diciembre"

"De octubre a diciembre"

Translation:From October to December

March 28, 2013

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anione

Is there any difference between "De octubre a diciembre" and "Desde octubre hasta diciembre"? If yes, would someone point out which is more commonly used? Thx


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mjconlan

"De...a..." gives an idea of Point A to Point B, where "desde...a..." conveys that you are also talking about the stuff between the two points. This is a bit more obvious in another translation of "desde" meaning "since". In this case, I would use "desde" to make clear that something was indeed going on the entire time through October, November and December.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PunkJesus

desde .... hasta....*


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KMAung

De octubre a deciembre means you are walking from October to December. In this word a refers to Direction. If you say so, somebody will ask you where is December or October is located. I wish this answer may help you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SlovenaGeo

Not very sure but I think "desde" and "hasta" are used for distance. For example, from England to France, will be "desde Inglaterra hasta Francia"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElakVarg

Este día va a ser perfecto, Desde pequeña yo esperé verlo llegar.

It's about time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ragnarok7

I'd really like to know this too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrizzyTreke

Why is it not "of October to December"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melba tariq

"De" means many things, two of them being "of" and "from". You decide which one by seeing which one makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nile842ll

i hate the word DE it means sooooooooooooooooooo many things


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EPIC-ONE

Why does de mean "from" and not "of"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melba tariq

It means both depending on the context, which one makes more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SailorAlly627

De and desde are so confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jazzkimme

I can't find the answer to this: How would you say "from October through December"? The phrases "to December" and "through December" have different meanings. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/droma

I think "From October through December." would be:

"De octubre hasta diciembre."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ukuleilis

It says de means from and to. Which is it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/littlemo

I don't know why it said "to" but I do know it is "of and from" and unfortunately many other things :'( Hope this helps :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ukuleilis

Thanks for the reply =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zekarama

...is a very holiday-compact time of the year.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karateduk

four birthdays in my family


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ammbaldwin

I typed From October to Dece!ber and it said i got it wrong, but since m is right next to !, why didnt it just say it was a typo??? Why does it say i got it wrong sometimes when i type it wrong and sometimes say its a typo and doesnt make me loose a ❤??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellen716914

When your "typo" is so far off the mark that the program can't recognize it, it marks it wrong. It's like spellchecker---there are limitations to its ability to recognize close guesses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wrosa2015

How is '!' near m?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zgrrredek

different keyboards all around the world :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lance86331

this one is misleading from is not listed when yoh click on de


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BornSinner1

I used google translator .. n this is what I got De octubre a diciembre - October to December Desde octubre a diciembre - from October to December Now I'm really confused. Native speakers help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melba tariq

First of all, don't trust Google Translate. "De octubre a diciembre" means "From October to December". If you were to put "desde" in front, you would have to add "hasta" in there. So, "Desde octubre hasta diciembre". Two ways of saying it. Does that make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/123hampster

it doesn't say from in the hint thing....... does it? :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.Anna15

+mjconlan thx for clearing that up for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaKim2

I know "of october to december" isn't proper english but isn't it literally correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

No, it's not literally correct. 'de' can mean 'of' or 'from' in English, and in this case, 'of' is the wrong choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayla.chandler

Is there a difference between " De octubre a diciembre" and Desede octubre hasta diciembre?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kiste-Nivelista

Is from October through to December wrong?.. Does it mean something different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y.ademas

So are months of the year normally not capitalized in Spanish (unless they begin a sentence)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

No, they aren't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karateduk

How do they know when fall is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamGallick

de octubre a diciembre...is cold, cold, and more cold where i live


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Legalize.Maria

'"De octubre a diciembre " - does it mean including all the days of October and including all the days of December? I would like to understand where this time gap stretches. Does the gap end before December, or does it include December?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diego640302

ur profile pic is trippy! have a lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoahsNoah

why does it matter?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouV68

Why is From October "through" December incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diego640302

November is sad 'cause he got left out

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