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"Are you counting sheep again?"

Translation:Zase počítáš ovce?

August 5, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ken55414

in English: counting sheep = trying to go to sleep. Does it have the same meaning in Czech? Or is there some other reason we are spending so much time on this phrase?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivegotnoname_

Yes, there is a "phrase" in Czech "počítat ovce" which means "trying to fall asleep"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/svrsheque

if you could let us know, how exactly did you mean "spending so much time"? because people ask? or was it presented to you over and over?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elephantenlein

Is 'Zase ovce počitáš' ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivegotnoname_

Although people would understand you, it's not correct, it has to be a question with it's word order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nekonyancer

I didnt realize word order was different for questions. Should we avoid ending questions with verbs in general?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Not in general, but it is one of the least likely placement and often results in an awkward sentence. The fewer words the sentence has the more likely the verb will be the last.

However there is nothing wrong with the proposed word order per se, the problem is how it changes the meaning. If they were some specific actual sheep, the order is absolutely fine:

Zase ty ovce počítáš?

Are you counting those sheep again?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gavin753673

Why does it need to be in this particular word order? What's the general rule regarding adverbs?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nueby

The general rule regarding adverbs is that there is no general rule regarding adverbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

It does not. If a sentence was rejected, you really have to tell us the sentence.

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