https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash

A spreadsheet of all words in the Polish Duolingo course + some neat grammar notes (created by me)

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Here it is: https://www.dropbox.com/s/2hzedozvtz7opf4/polish.xlsx?dl=0 I was creating this document while doing the course, including any word or phrase I've seen along the way and put an English translation next to it. I did it mostly for myself, such spreadsheets help me to understand the grammar of languages better and remember the words better as well. But I thought others might find it useful as well so I decided to post it.

All words are divided into 5 categories: nouns (the biggest one), adjectives, verbs, adverbs and all other stuff (pronouns, numerals, prepositions etc.) + there is an additional category for some quirky phrases that can't be easily broken down to translate it word by word without losing some meaning.

Then there are grammar tips:

The first category is the noun declension. I grouped it myself, the first Roman numeral stands for a noun's gender (there are 5 of them in Polish, imho), the second letter stands for a noun's ending and the final numeral marks the paradigm of declension. I've counted 55 patterns of declension plus some nouns are indeclinable but this is based entirely on words found in the Duolingo course, there are probably some other declension patterns I haven't encountered.

The second category is irregular nouns; I found 41 in this course. For some of nouns the quirk is only about an unexpected vowel/consonant change but for most the irregularity is about the endings (strictly speaking, some of those nouns aren't actually irregular and belong to a rare declension pattern, but it would be painful to try to redo it so let's just leave it as it is, ok?).

The third category is adjective AND numeral declension; the adjective declension in Polish is very regular and there are not that many numerals so I decided to group them together.

The fourth category is the verb conjugation. I decided to use the patterns found on a Polish Wiktionary because it'd be too complicated for me to try to create my own patterns and also because I liked them a lot. There are 11 main conjugation patterns and 18 overall if you count all the subpatterns. There have been no verbs fitting the pattern VIIIb in the course, by the way.

The fifth category is irregular verbs; I found 48 in this course BUT I decided not to create additional tables for some verbs when the only difference with the listed word is the additional prefix (like powiedzieć and odpowiedzieć) which doesn't influence the conjugation at all. To be honest, the order of these verbs is very messy because of many reasons but I don't really feel like trying to order it correctly.

The sixth, and final, category is pronouns. I think I listed all the pronouns found in this course including personal, reflexive, possessive, demonstrative, interrogative, attributive and negative.

Some additional notes:

Each noun entry has a noun in Polish, then its gender (m pers for masculine personal, m anim for masculine animate, m inanim for masculine inanimate, f for feminine and n for neuter), then consonant and vowel changes if there are any and then the declension pattern the noun belongs to (there is an asterisk next to it if the noun is irregular).

With adjectives it is similar, but there are no gender notes (because it's an adjective, lol) and no declension pattern because it is very straighforward: the hard declension is for adjectives ending in -y and preceded by a hard consonant, the mixed declension is for those ending in -gi and -ki, the soft declension is for those either ending in -i or -y but preceded by a soft consonant. Some adjectives (like sam and wart) don't have a usual -y/-i ending but are declined regularly in all other forms. To be fair, there ARE some tricky adjectives in the soft declension like duży where an expected form of masculine personal plural is also duży but is instead duzi but I'm not sure if it counts as an irregular adjective. Then there is an ending of a comparative form if it's not regular. The regular ending of adjectives is -'ejszy (' is for softening) but many take -szy and some may be completely irregular or have some pretty unexpected changes (like the drop of -k- suffix or some vowel changes). The superlative form is always the same as the comparative ones + the prefix naj-.

All verbs are divided into perfective and imperfective ones. To be fair, it was pretty hard to find another forms for all those verbs and some are pretty questionable (native speaker assessment needed perhaps) but overall I think I nailed it. The ones that don't have a perfective form have a grey cell instead. It's also a verb in Polish + any consonant/vowel change + the conjugation pattern (with an asterisk if irregular). Some verbs like odpowiedzieć don't have a separate entry in the section of irregular verbs but instead have a note "See the conjugation of powiedzieć" so you don't feel lost.

Adverbs generally don't change their forms so it's easy to handle them but some have a comparative and a superlative forms. It's usually -'ej but I included the irregular ones.

The section Other is a dump of everything else. There are some consonant/vowel changes sometimes. For prepositions I also mentioned any grammatical cases with which they can be used. HOW to use them is a different question, you can find it out in the course. ;)

The section Phrases may be a bit messy but it'll be very complicated to try to change it, so I guess it's good enough too, eh?

Some general notes:

The consonant changes mark the difference in pronunciation rather than spelling, partly because of the peculiar spelling in Polish. For example, the Dative and Locative singular for woda (water) is wodzie, not wodźe, but I still noted (d/dź). That's because this change is hidden by the vowel i and the word is not actually pronounces vo-dzee-ye but vo-je. On another hand, the opposite is also true. The word koń has ń only in Nominative singular and Instrumental plural and the form is koni- elsewhere. I didn't mark anything because there is no difference in the pronunciation of the word's stem across different cases.

The endings in noun and adjective declension patterns and verb conjugation patterns marked in RED mark the following effects: ch -> sz for nouns and ch -> ś for adjectives, d -> dź, g -> dz, k -> c, ł -> l, n -> ń, r -> rz, s -> ś, t-> ć, z -> ź; also in such cases the change 'a -> 'e is very common. The endings or stems marked RED in the sections of irregular nouns are verbs are irregular.

The endings in noun declension patterns and verb conjugation patterns marked in GREEN mark the effects of a closed syllable vowel changes: no vowel -> e or sometimes 'e, o -> ó, ę -> ą.

The endings in verb conjugation patterns marked in PURPLE mark the following effects: d -> dz, g -> ż, k -> cz, s -> sz, t -> c, z -> ż.

The forms of nouns or verbs where the cells are marked grey are either non-existent or extremely rare in use.

The forms of masculine plural past tense, conditional, active and passive adjectival participles are actually used ONLY for masculine personal nouns but it was a bit a bit hard to rework the tables to account for this so they are just marked as masculine.

Any vowel/consonant change or ending in italic is optional.

That's all, folks! If there are any mistakes or if some additions are needed, please write them down below.

P.S. Yes, I take learning languages very responsibly, lol.

[Update 07.08.2018]: Marked all irregular forms in the section of irregular verbs and changed the conjugation type for several verbs.

[Update 23.09.2018]: Changed the way conjugation tables look (I think they look better now), now they're also more grammatically correct. Added comparative and superlative forms to the adjective declension tables. Decided to classify soft adjectives ending with -y and getting the -i ending in masculine person plural as irregular (there are only 2 of them in the course) + classified adjectives with suppletive comparatives and superlatives as irregular as well + adjectives with 0 ending are also irregular now. Other minor corrections.

[Update 05.11.2018]: Minor corrections in the declension tables of pronouns.


The discussion about the Czech spreadsheet: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/28367063

The discussion about the German spreadsheet: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/29535374

7 months ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/NtateNarin
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This is one of the nicest things anyone has offered on these discussions, and I've been on Duolingo for a long time! Thank you so much for this and for your hard work, and I wish you the best in your Polish language journey! Also, I hope you enjoy the lingots. :-)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash
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Thank you so much! :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluffy-Dasher

Wow, thanks so much :D

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jia673264
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Thank you so much for your hard work ! I've saved a copy for myself, and I'm sure it will be very useful to others learning Polish as well!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash
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Thank you for your kind words. :) Hopefully others will find it useful too.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolverineIAm
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Have some lingots hahaha. Good value. Thank you so much. :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolverineIAm
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Question. Did you ever make a sheet for Czech as well?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash
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Great question! I've already done it actually! :) It's complete but it may take some time to get rid of all mistakes I'll find. I found plenty of them in my Polish spreadsheet before posting it. I think I'll post it this week in the Czech subforum.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WolverineIAm
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Thanks! I'll def check it out when it post it on there. I'm planning to tackle Czech too. :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperLearner007
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Oh man! I am learning Czech because I live in the Czech Republic and boy, that would be so helpful and kind of you.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash
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The sheet is ready, btw. ;)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CammyEm
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You are a good person, bright_flash. I can tell.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnKidd4
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wow.... what a great thing you have done... thank you very much for sharing - here are some lingots for you - I hope you find them useful. ps: I had to add the lingots above I hope you received them...

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash
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Guys, if you want to check out, I just posted a similar spreadsheet for Czech. :) You can find it at the very bottom of the post.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperLearner007
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That is really impressive. One the most useful dicussions ever created. That's really tough work.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davey944676

That is very kind of you, and very useful. Especially useful as it can be downloaded and reviewed offline. Thank you for your work.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99
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Very nice indeed. I think Duo doesn't mention it anywhere, but "cześć (f) (eś/-) (IVc1*)" can also be used just to mean "Hi!" or "Hello!".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bright_flash
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Look up the section Phrases on my sheet. :) It's there.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99
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So it is! My bad!!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xLenaatje
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Thank you so much!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sky_venom
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This sounds like something very useful, so I'll save it in my browser! But seriously, this is so much work, it's very nice of you to share it! Thanks!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c_bostar

thank you so much, I've been hand writing them all and didn't want to type them all out

3 months ago
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