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  5. "Você tinha cortado o queijo."

"Você tinha cortado o queijo."

Translation:You had cut the cheese.

March 28, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danikalifornia

Who cut the cheese??? Lol.........


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob3x

I came here just to check if someone had made a joke about this sentence. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dadinho

i'm so happy this is the only comment in the discussion. <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TobyBartels

In the '90s, kids' cartoons in the USA were getting creative with the required educational component … https://youtu.be/yGqxb3vLL1A


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reno300

Does this mean the same thing in Portuguese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phaeluis

No. At least in Brazil there is no such correlation. The act of "farting" (peidar) is usually exclaimed, asking "who has the yellow hand?" ("quem está com a mão amarela")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

You just got a lingot for talking about "uma mao amarela." What turns a hand yellow? ! ; ) At least we're not talking about "skid marks" and "Hershey squirts" !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phaeluis

Thank you very much by lingot! There is an old belief (usually among children) that says that farting leaves the yellow hand. I never believed it but I confess that I was suspicious and tested it on me, without success! Lol kkkkkk I did not understand this: "" skid marks "and" Hershey squirts "". Could you explain it to me? Gtranslator did not help me with that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ljohnsontd

When a car stops quickly it leaves "Marcas de deslizamento" when a person does not wipe their behind well after going to the bathroom, they leave the same type of "marcas" in their "cuecas." Hershey's is a brand of chocolate syrup... you can draw your conclusions from there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phaeluis

Oh my, how funny! In Brazil we also have this analogy with the "slip marks" on the asphalt! We say we call this "freada" (braking) or if the "situation" is very dark, it is called "freadão" (big braking).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phaeluis

I don't think so. What means it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

Just to be clear: "What does it mean?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidkzach

Well, we've all been joking about it, but the real question is: does the idiom translate or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

Good question, and now you can check out the answer! Take a look at phaeluis....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinWnuk

Like everyone else, just had to check out the comments. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GilDuca

If English is not your native language and you are wondering what is funny with this saying, you will find explanation in http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/cut+the+cheese. There are probably formulas in many languages to express the same idea. April 27, 2015


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrnpcFTMarkRMOwl

"Whoever smellt it, ...." If it is the same joke in Portuguese, do they have the same kind of follow up jokes? ; D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phaeluis

No. At least in Brazil there is no such correlation. The act of "farting" (peidar) is usually exclaimed, asking "who has a yellow hand" ("quem está com a mão amarela")?

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