1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Lui è un uomo comune."

"Lui è un uomo comune."

Translation:He is a common man.

March 29, 2013

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ispirac

I think, maybe is better solution that we write " a simple man or ordinary man".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahArnoldTPS

A 'simple' man nowadays may imply that he has a disability, hence why 'Simple Simon Says' is now just 'Simon Says'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmcolletti

Why? What's wrong with common man? Is a very common phrase. Google "fanfare for the common man", meravigliosa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2416

"A common man" does not have the same sense as "the common man".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EspaTalia

Quite right. The only reason "A common man" would be more appropriate is if the man cloned himself and is now all over the place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_Lauren

Wouldn't you use 'simplice' if you meant 'simple'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luxr33

the word is semplice. but yes you are right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

I was marked wrong for "ordinary" on the dog question. It had to be a "common dog." ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alesley

In English we would say "he is common" meaning he has bad manners 'maleducato'. We would not say "he is a common man"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamMansbr1

In Australia "the common man" is the average person. But we pretend to be classless so there aren't any other than common people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuerraAmanda

Seriously? That is new for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

What is this actually supposed to MEAN? By "common" does it mean "average" or does it mean "crass" "base" or uneducated? Hoping for someone fluent in both English & Italian to answer this. Grazie!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mukkapazza

Think of it like "average Joe" which doesn't usually have a pejorative meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aurora642929

I am italian, "common" in thi case means "average" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luxr33

uomo comune in italian means a man like the others


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanCoope312550

So the translation should say 'ordinary'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2416

Common, ordinary, everyday... those are all synonyms that would work here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarinaPaula

In Spanish, we say "comùn" to mean "ordinary", but there's not a bad connotation associated with the term. So I guess Italian is the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiordanoPrimo

He deserves a fanfare!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzar_ivan

Lui è un uomo comune, ma lei è una donna speziale ... why is duolinggo according denigrating sentences for men but flattering sentences for women? This is sexist! Lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuerraAmanda

aren't common, regular and usual all the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gigglemo

Yes but in England if you say someone is common it is offensive. I believe it comes from the way that high society would refer to most people (the common people).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/involans

Common has a extra sense, not shared by the others, of joint ownership.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuerraAmanda

It's because in Brazil we use those three as synonymous, and since Italian looks really alike Portuguese it got me thinking...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woozlification

I think most words we think of as synonyms in English are not exactly the same. If you're a native speaker, you'll probably just use them instinctively. The difference may be very subtle, and difficult to explain, but "feel" right or wrong. For example, you'd never normally say that somebody was "usual". That word would be more for habits and routines than just to describe what somebody is like. "Normal", "ordinary", (and probably "regular" in US English) are so similar, but you could use them to describe the person in a way you couldn't with "usual", but even they aren't the same as each other. If you said someone was normal, it would be neutral, but if you said they were ordinary, it could have the meaning that they were nothing special. The differences between the words are like different spices. Common and simple are further away in meaning from those other ones. Simple could mean uncomplicated or it could mean that you are not mentally quick. Common would be more normal with animals and things than people as the opposite of rare. For a person, it sounds like you are looking down on them and thinking that they behave like a pig :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/learninggerman

"he is a regular man" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusicMan97

Because regular isn't always common. think of all of those crazy 60's and 70's fads! those were common, but they certainly not regular!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/goldfeldj

Couldn't this be idiomatic? i.e.: "He is a commoner"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stsmi

When was the last time anyone said that I wonder! But the Americans do say 'he's a regular guy' referring to his having common habits and abilities and not his bowels, of course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kacnique

Duoling needs to learn what ORDINARY means


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sjRoman

He is a normal man


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/truthorcon

He's an average Joe!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaribelRod231682

I wrote the correct sentence twice, but was marked as incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deSchneeberg

This is what we noblemen call the ignoble men.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filmss

Lynyrd Skynyrd feelings


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MusicMan97

Why do other languages always have the adjective after the direct object? I'm curious to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2416

Not all languages, and not all the time. But it is common in the Romance languages for the syntax to be mostly noun-adjective (for all noun phrases, not uniquely in the direct object).

There really is no "why". Different languages develop differently and have different rules. Italian speakers and Spanish speakers are working to get used to the English way of saying adjective-noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger527376

Interesting question (noun-adj or adj-noun?) and hard to get a feel for. I read in another discussion of the fitum a very useful tip: BAGS for the adj-noun form: Beauty (bello/a, brutto), Age (giovane, vecchio), Goodness (buona, cattiva), Size (oiccolo, grande). Seems to cover 80-85% of the cases. I would like to give credit to the contributor, but forgot her name (pretty sure it was a 'she').


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2416

BANGS: beauty, age, number, goodness, size. Although as I learned while studying Spanish (which possibly also applies to some degree in other Romance langages), sometimes whether it comes before or after changes the meaning.

https://www.thoughtco.com/italian-adjective-order-4098168

https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat590727

The only context I know of in which the phrase 'common man' appears is the marvellous '1066 and all that', where it is used entirely ironically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2416

You should listen to Aaron Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sylviamora

Mm hmm you tell it Duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrazyEqlsGenius

He is a communist man.

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.