"बुआ के पति फूफा होते हैं।"

Translation:Aunt's husband is uncle.

August 10, 2018

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

In English, we would have to use determiners here, either "the aunt" and "the uncle," if referring to specific ones, or "an aunt" and "an uncle," if making a general statement.

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KTo228

I agree this should be something like "An aunt's husband is an uncle" or "The husband of an aunt is an uncle".

August 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/IsLauraMe

This is a very Indian English way to say it but I think it would not sound natural in English...and yes Hota refers to a general statement.

November 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RanzoG

Hmm, interesting. I don't disagree, but I'd say that all these terms are being used in relation to the person speaking AND apply to what the person in that position calls someone. Let's say you call your grandmother Ney-ney and your grandfather Pappi. You'd say "Pappi is Neyney's husband." I admit the situation here is not exactly the same, because Bua and Phupha are terms for anyone's aunt/uncle. And yet, you've got at least three different terms for aunts and uncles in Hindi so you can't just say "an aunt" -- you have to be specific.

You could say (to fit your criteria) "A mother's sister's husband is an uncle." It seems thought that if the native Hindi speaker is translating this, they would personalize it. Just a quirk of the language that doesn't translate perfectly.

Still, I agree with you that some accommodation needs to be made in the answer/reply options.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

I'm not sure what you are getting at. Yes, the Hindi terms have information encoded in them that the English terms do not. If that information is not vital, however, the English terms that cover that relationship (along with others) is the term that should be used in translation. If I were translating /buaa/ and /phuphaa/ into English, though, I would use the terms "aunt" and uncle." This sentence, therefore, could be either "the aunt's husband is the uncle" or "an aunt's husband is an uncle." Both those sentences make grammatical sense in English and could be true, so that is how I would translate this sentence. There may be a dialect of English in which "aunt" and "uncle" are used as terms of address, like "grandma" and "grandpa," as they apparently are in Hindi, but it sounds very odd in the dialects in which I am conversant. We might say "Auntie," but I have never heard "Uncle" without a name attached, e.g. Uncle Bob or Uncle Bill. Consequently, I am simply pointing out that, if you were interested in learning English for use in the United States and the United Kingdom, the sentence "Aunt's husband is uncle" does not make any sense. Indeed, it is grating even to write.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RanzoG

Again, I agree with your recommendation.

Ah, but you do know a dialect of English where Aunt(ie) and Uncle are used as an address, along with mom, dad, grandpa, sister, etc: Indian English! The course is (perhaps inadvertently) teaching Indian English, which is at least as useful in India as Hindi :-)

If they were to add /jī/ after all these terms in the lessons it would be more realistic.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

In fact, I do not know Indian English, though I am very happy to learn some of it. If those are the forms of address used, then the correct answer should stay, it seems to me, though "the" and "an" should be accepted.

It is kind of odd to me that they have not introduced "ji," since it seems to be quite common in instruction books and in the spoken Hindi one sees in films.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Theo763305

This is not English. While glosses can be helpful they are not translations.

January 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/TheModerateMan

I would never use "Aunt" as a proper noun in English. It would always be "Auntie." Uncle can be a proper noun, however.

November 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielKnow8

Again, weird English

November 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Aakhil6

The husband of father's sister is an uncle should have been accepted.

February 15, 2019
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