"मेरी चाय में कम चीनी है।"

Translation:There is less sugar in my tea.

August 11, 2018

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerry707667

"There is too little sugar in my tea" would be more commonly said in English.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeebo7

Yeah, this is definitely Hinglish, but you do hear Indians using 'less' like this quite often.

August 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhasanova

that's true but this could just as easily be a comparative. as in, "there is less sugar in my tea (than in my coffee)"

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheModerateMan

It could also be "There is not (too) much sugar in my tea." "Too little" implies that the speaker would prefer more sugar, which is not necessarily the case.

October 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkiraDarveau

I have never heard this phrase in English.

March 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/another-dave

Can I understand "कम" as "not enough" in this context or would that be incorrect?

March 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raypab

hindi is correct.. English doesn't seem to be wrong

January 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel903816

I would only use less if I was comparing. Ex: There is less sugar in my tea than I would like. Is this sentence necessarily negative? What would you say if you are happy with just a little sugar in your tea?

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErmaGirard

It is not possible to say there is less sugar in my tea.Less is a comparative...so,you can only compare it to something else.For example:there is less sugar in my tea than in yours.

June 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyshaRuman

My tea has less sugar

January 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulaGdeSa

... than what? "Less" is a comparison.

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bhasanova

Well yes, in American and British English it's always a comparison, but even there you don't need to say what's being compared. "Look at his tea! Mine has less sugar [than his]" But also in Hindi कम means "less" or "little", and in Indian English "less" could mean "little" too.

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulaGdeSa

I beg to disagree on both counts. Your example demonstrates that there needs to be a comparison context (even if it is an implied one) for "less" to be used. When you say that in Hindi कम means "less" or "little", you support precisely the point that I'm making: that in this sentence कम should be translated as "little" rather than "less," otherwise it's not grammatical.

Saying that in Indian English "less" also means "little" doesn't make sense. Why should we bastardise the English language to justify a mistranslation from a specific Hindi usage?

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel903816

Then why is it marked wrong if I say "There is a little sugar in my tea."?

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rachel903816

Oh, it works if you leave out "a": There is little sugar in my tea.

March 1, 2019
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