"Noi non dimentichiamo il nostro compleanno."

Translation:We do not forget our birthday.

3/29/2013, 5:21:53 AM

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TheGandalf
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I have a feeling this is what twins would say.

6/17/2013, 2:28:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AndresZumaran
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Exactly.

9/20/2013, 6:52:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Wedchidna

Thanks for giving a shot trying to figure it out. But still, without any given context, it is one weird phrase. Especially to people who doesn't know twins. Learning a language isn't about word-by-word translation. Not even Google Translator does that anymore. Punishing the "birthdays" understanding of context is simply unthoughtful.

11/2/2014, 3:29:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/superalej29

APLAUSE. A MOMENT OF SILENCE FOR "TWINS"

1/4/2016, 2:37:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/carbis
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Sounds like golem is saying it. "No, precious, we don't forget our birthday, do we?"

1/9/2014, 1:38:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/bsarpas
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'...we don't forgetses our birtdaysess.'

9/8/2014, 5:27:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Elena18

Does this make sense in Italian? In English, we would say "birthdayS"- unless we were both born on the same day.

3/29/2013, 5:21:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/almondhoney

Sounds OK to me, like a general statement about people. We don't forget our (own) birthday.

3/30/2013, 9:39:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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This is one of the many English anomalies. Either singular or plural would be correct here even if they aren't twins. Another nice one in English is that we say 'I am not' but we ask 'Aren't I?' not 'Amn't I?'

12/13/2013, 5:02:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/circumbendibus
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I just recently read about this. http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-amn1.htm It seems from the article that "amn't", "an't", and "ain't" all once served the purpose, but fell out of use due to a miscommunication over grammar prescription. It's too bad; they make more sense than "aren't".

8/3/2014, 4:07:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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I'm not surprised. English has always been very fluid grammatically. Probably because it's a bastard language. That's where the spelling anomalies arise from: thought from dogt, yacht from jacht (I think - in any case a Dutch word for a small sailboat used for hunting) and so on. But then, a certain English reverend gentleman wrote a book on English grammar in the 19th century and it caught on in the Victorian era. However, most of what he wrote (I believe, since I have never read his book) was his own opinion, gleaned from Latin grammar et al. The sort of thing he came up with was 'It is I,' which is simply not correct, but a slavish following of the Latin nominative, verb to be, complement, where the complement was also nominative.

8/3/2014, 6:21:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/A.J.Stephen

But isn't "aren't I" quite familiar/even incorrect (from a grammatical point of view) ?

7/8/2014, 4:07:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax
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Yes, 'aren't I' is not grammatically correct.

7/9/2014, 3:43:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/A.J.Stephen

Ok thx, getting a bit confused with colloquial turns of phrase ;)

7/11/2014, 2:16:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ColettaD
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In English, "am I not?" is preferable to "aren't I." For example, Angelina Jolie would say (as she poses), "I am beautiful, am I not?"

9/16/2014, 10:31:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Babiole

What about anniversary? That would explain the "nostro compleanno", but it was refused.

1/29/2014, 9:22:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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I think 'compleanno' means 'birthday' exclusively. 'Anniversary' would be 'anniversario'.

1/29/2014, 3:14:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax
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When I hover over dimentichiamo the second suggestion has '(we) leave (behind)'. I would have used the word lasciamo. Can somebody explain the difference between the usages of those two verbs in that case?

2/17/2014, 1:42:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
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I now see where the word "dimentia" comes from. :-)

9/27/2015, 12:20:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dewluca

Sorry, but I disagree that this is "okay" in English. It is ONLY okay if you are talking about twins or two people who share a birthday. In every other case you would say either "People do not forget their birthdays." or "We do not forget our birthdays." This is a bad sentence to use to teach these words.

10/9/2014, 10:38:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenM
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You know, 'we' can be used in a slightly different way. For example, 'We don't forget our supper,' or 'We wouldn't want to forget our birthday, would we?' Certainly, I can easily envisage situations where 'We don't forget our birthday' is perfectly acceptable. I would go so far as to suggest that it is akin to the French 'on' in this sentence.

10/10/2014, 7:49:38 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SandraSilva17

This sounds like something that Prince Charles or the Queen would say. The royal "we"

10/18/2014, 1:12:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CecilieO.

This sounds like the royal we.

1/2/2014, 4:15:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Shan237521
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Royal we.

3/3/2017, 4:12:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/alexros83

According to two dictinaries I have consulted so far (italian app linked to wiktionary.org and Dizionario Italiano app by The free dictionay.com), the word "compleanno" comes to Italian feom the Spanish "cumpleaƱo". In Spanish "cumpleaƱo" is used to refer not only the birthday (date) but also the birthday party.

I did not find any information to sustain this interpretation or translation bit it might be referring to the party.

Equally in English the word birthday can refer to the festivity or party. Even though it is more likely to hear "birthday party".

5/11/2018, 8:27:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Robinson_Ian

I thought that's what I just typed

10/19/2018, 1:03:12 PM
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