"Saya punya gaun."

Translation:I have a dress.

August 15, 2018

17 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikhail311

halo saya dari Indonesia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary473240

I feel like this should read "saya ada gaun" if this is the translation. "Saya punya gaun" more correctly translates to "my dress".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeldipops

The thing is that it's common idiomatic Indonesian to use "punya" like a verb this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Why "like a verb"? "Punya" is a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeldipops

Sure, if you use something like a verb, then it is a verb. But punya is also a noun and that gets confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I don't think "Ada" is the right verb to express "to have". It means "to be" with the meaning, in a place (Saya ada di sini). Or "There is..."

But, I've checked on "Kamus Besar", and they say that to have is one of the meaning, so I would like to know when "ada" could mean "to have"?

https://kbbi.kemdikbud.go.id/entri/ada

mempunyai: ia tidak ada uang (He/She has money).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarthBiis

I'm almost certain that "Rok" is also translated to "dress" but it is not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iksaan

Rok is more of a skirt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serfive

As a Dutch person, I can comfirm that Rok means skirt. Its the exact word we have, and it is very likely that the Dutch took it to Indonesia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeldipops

I had been taught that a rok was a skirt as distinct from a dress.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c3trash

I don't get why sometimes "the" is accepted and sometimes not. Why can't this be "I have the dress". "Kamu menulis menu" has the accepted answer as "You write the menu".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ubayd13

interesting question - I was marked wrong as well when I wrote "the", then I tried translating it. "the dress" seems to be "gaun itu", and just "gaun" seems to be "a dress", so it may be contextual as to what's made clear and what's not. I think some explanation would help


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YaleCai

My dress = Saya punya gaun I have a dress = Saya ada gaun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serfive

My dress = gain saya I have a dress = saya punya gaun Saya ada gaun makes no sense. Ada means 'there is/are'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UpzahwvW

If you're in Papua, "saya punya gaun" can also mean "my dress" since [pronoun] followed by /punya/ is a common way to express possession in Papua, Indonesia.

So, technically this phrase has at least two correct translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JobertRara

wait is it LongHenry and PERCE_NEIGE

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