"Waalaikumsalam, silakan."

Translation:Greetings to you, too, please.

August 16, 2018

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mitchellbh

This translation isn’t great. Waalaikumsalam is the response to Assalamualaikum. Both are used primarily by the Muslim community in Indonesia and if you use them people will assume you’re Muslim as well, not necessarily a bad thing, though, as it will put people at ease if they think they share your religion. I’ve rarely heard “silakan” added after waalaikumsalam but it just means “please,” and I suppose is meant to make this response extra polite.

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/demoksaputra

As an Indonesian myself, I was taken aback by this sentence.

August 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cameron221258

What would be used instead? "Halo, silakan'?

April 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JulieFrank12

I recommend during Alpha Testing that this and it’s response be removed from these lessons and I stick to that opinion. It is not generally used so why teach it?

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/c3trash

Although, I think these words (assalamualaikum, waalaikumsalam) are nice to know. What should be taught in these lessons are generic words that can be used in any setting or location. These are not for general usage.

March 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/chris_cester

While I understand every language has foreign words thrown in, and Indonesia is a predominately Muslim country, Arabic words, French words, English words, don’t necessarily need module time. Most people, if not all, know the response to As-Salaam-Alaikum, without needing to learn it in a foreign language lesson. A more appropriate lesson would have been ‘Salamt Malam, Silakan masuk’ or something more time based for greetings rather than religious. Evening, morning, afternoon. In all my travels to Indonesia I have never been greeted as such. I assume, unless they know you and your faith, they keep their greetings time based.

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Julien__S

For me, the words "come" and "in" were missing, so it was impossible to build the correct response.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Alf42

Yes, this was the case for me too.

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Belinda764254

Indonesian has two words for "please": silakan, when you're inviting someone to do something, and tolong when you're asking a favour of them. Silakan is regularly/ commonly used to mean "please... come in" (which, strictly speaking should be silakan masuk) or "please... eat" (silakan makan).

Having said that, I believe the course should be teaching "silakan masuk" because it is the proper way to speak, rather than lazy lingo.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JimMacFly

Living in Indonesia, I've never heard it here, I use to hear it a lot in the middle east where it is the custom, but in Indonesia it is really used only by muslims when addressing each other and even so not always. I believe it would be better to spend more time on the different greetings depending on the hour (morning, midday, afternoon, evening)

August 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mitchellbh

I lived in Indonesia for two years and I heard this greeting often. Almost all meetings are started by saying assalamualaikum. I lived in a rural part of Java, however, so it might be more common in places other than the cities or Bali. I doubt orang Bali use the phrase as they’re mostly Hindu. I never went to Bali so I’m not sure. It’s a good phrase to know, but shouldn’t be taught at this level and maybe not even in the course.

August 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Belinda764254

I've lived in West Papua, East Kalimantan, and am now living in Bali - almost 6 years in total. The only times I've heard assalamualaikum or waalaikumsalam is when Muslims are speaking to other (known) Muslims. It has never been said to me (as a bule). Given that there are plenty of bahasa Indonesia greetings to choose from, I'd rather learn those, rather than Arabic.

Also, it's only now that Indonesia is becoming more and more Islamic that Arabic words are creeping in and replacing Indonesian words/ phrases. For example, "Selamat Hari Raya Idul Fitri" has/ is being replace with "Eid Mubarak" or "Eid al-Fitr".

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/antspants01

You don't get taught this first before being tested on it

August 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NamakuSergio

This is a Muslim greetings, and even living in Indonesia with a Muslim family I have mever hear that.

October 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Belinda764254

I'm looking to learn Indonesian, not Arabic. While I understand that most Indonesians are Muslim, not even all Muslims use the Arabic words because there are proper and very common Indonesian words. And for those of us living in Bali, having to learn Arabic words is doubly pointless.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/MushtaqAli6

Translation is "Peace be on you too, please ..." should be makan / eat , minum / drink .. etc

August 17, 2018
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