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  5. "Sri makan nasi gorengku."

"Sri makan nasi gorengku."

Translation:Sri is eating my fried rice.

August 16, 2018

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

OK, the translation here, for the first time that I have noticed, is in the progressive mood in English. Is there or is there not a progressive form in Bahasa Indonesia? If there is, then the progressive should also be accepted as a translation for the Indonesian present tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick392366

There are no tenses in Bahasa Indonesia.
The verb remains unchanged, no matter the tense or the person (singular/plural).
Easy, isn't it ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

OK, then all of the sentences like "she is eating" that have been marked wrong should have been allowed. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick392366

If I have to translate "She is eating" from English to Indonesian, I would translate it as "Dia sedang makan".
That would be a more precise translation compared to "Dia makan".

The word "sedang" in the sentence indicates that the action is occurring right now and that the action is not finished yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

"Precise" in a sentence with no context tends to mean "what I have in my mind." If there is a context in which a given translation would be appropriate, then it should be allowed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jannienadine

what is that difficult


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sqsola

In everyday speech, you can translate this sentence into the progressive (to be + "verb"-ing). If you wanted to make it explicit that a verb was happening now, you would use the "sedang" modifier - "Sri sedang makan nasi gorengku".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/INIKENT

Is there a way to highlight and indicate when a name has been used within an exercise? I have often become tripped because I’m unfamiliar with Indonesian names while learning I think the name may actually have some impact on the meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

If you are unfamiliar with a word, you can always move your cursor over the word and it will provide a translation, or in this case indicate that it is a name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick392366

Yes, that's right.
Names are written with a capital letter.
So, that's another way to see that you're probably seeing a name and not a new word.
I probably forgot some of the names, or maybe more names will appear, but these are the names that I've seen in the course so far :
Andi, Tini, Dimas, Sri,....
.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/INIKENT

Okay then thanks James. Maybe it’s because I’m using a mobile browser, but when I tap name within Chrome, the translation/description text is just the name written again without any further clarification. Maybe that isn’t the case for pc users.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/INDAHNESIA

Sri eats my fried rice.. is also correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul761715

So you add ku on to the end of the adjective to make it yours? Eg roti bakar becomes roti bakarku?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderR152794

Jesus, that one took me about 8 goes until I realised that she was eating MY nasi goreng!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kukys1

Sri eats my fried rice... Wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iko-Nyan

Hello, the slow motion mode is not correct in Indonesian. The e in "goreng" word supposed to be using different pronounce of e. Thank you!


[deactivated user]

    Goreng= Fried.

    GorengKu= ??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

    -ku is my. My nasi goreng.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iko-Nyan

    Nasi goreng is a noun. It can't be separated like dragonfly. Ku = mine. Nasi gorengku = my fried rice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JTJ2Sb

    Learning in Indonesia I was always taught that it can mean either if those two things. Indonesian is a very contextual language, as there are no conjugations, few genders, and a strange way of presenting tenses, you have to have context to have the exact translation

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