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  5. "Saya makan ketika dia pergi."

"Saya makan ketika dia pergi."

Translation:I ate when he left.

August 17, 2018

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Report: The English sentence is unnatural or has an error. The sequence of tenses (I guess one of the harder things about English) is all wrong here. Either "I ate when he left" or "I eat when he leaves," both of which I think would also be the same sentence in Bahasa Indonesia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick392366

The sequence of tenses (I guess one of the harder things about English) is all wrong here.

Yes, I agree with you.
The sequence of tenses is wrong.

Either "I ate when he left" or "I eat when he leaves," both of which I think would also be the same sentence in Bahasa Indonesia.

Yes, that's right.
It's the same sentence in Bahasa Indonesia.
The English translation depends on the (missing) context.
"I ate when he left" or "I eat when he leaves," should both be acceptable.
Other translations are also possible.
It depends on the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Because the meaning is so dependent on context, they'll just have to keep adding acceptable translations. The Japanese program had to do much the same, and is still working on it, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8enP1jip

Yes, I think you're right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carbsrule

Or "I eat when he has left"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/volumniax

Hmm. I can only see this with a future form: "I will eat when he has gone" or "I will eat when he leaves"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waltcamp45

I think you're right. In Indonesian, future indicators, such as "akan", are often omitted. A future-facing expression seems the most sensible translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick392366

It's not necessarily a future facing expression.
It might be a sentence where you're telling a story about what happened yesterday.

Something like this :
You wanted to eat, but you were disturbed by someone and you ate when he left.

In this context I would probably say "I ate when he left" or "I ate when he has left".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chiliem

'To eat' should be in some past tense, because it happens at the same time as 'to leave'. He has left is a past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Code.Slinger

Why can't this also be "I eat when he goes"? There's no context which would indicate that he has already left.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Santi_monika

you can say that too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/penguinmother

Report: The English sentence is unnatural or has an error Since the Bahasa Indonesia sentence can be in both present and past tense, the English translation has to be acceptable as either: "I eat when she goes" (present tense) OR "I ate when she left" (past tense) The two cannot be combined.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johan807389

Could this be "I was eating when he left"? Or does it only refer to the situation that I ate only after he left, not while he was still present?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KirstenVan622876

In correct English this would be translated to "I was eating when I left", not "I ate when he left". Since I had to pick the words from cards this was my only option, but it felt very unnatural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

In my dialect of English, those would both be grammatically possible, but would mean two different things. The first would mean I was eating for a stretch of time, at some point during which he left. The second would mean I waited until he left, and then I ate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anno35

I agree with JamesTWils


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donny309620

It could be "I ate once he was gone", or "I ate after he left", or "I ate while he was gone"; but some thing is NOT quite right with "I ate when he left".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I think the problem is that we usually emphasize the duration over time of eating. If it were something we usually think of as instantaneous, you would not have a problem, e.g. "I locked the door when he left," "I went to bed when he left," or even "I wrote the message when he left."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanKS5202Apr2020

Should be " I eat after he left "?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

No, as that simple present would indicate a repetitive or general action, and if you always eat after he leaves, then he "leaves," also in the simple present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErinPalmer13

Why "ketika" not "kapan"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gustobelly

So should 'I will eat when he leaves' be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian401692

She left me to eat alone ... sadder, but useful ;) , how to say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimSteel3

I think we're mixing tenses. I think the sentence should be 'saya sudah makan ketika día sudah pergi but will confirm that with my Bahasa Indonesia teacher.

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