"Assalamualaikum, selamat siang."

Translation:Greetings, good afternoon.

August 19, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Stardoch

I have mixed feelings about having Assalamualaikum used as a general way to express greetings. I have relatives in Indonesia who aren't Muslim and who would look at me funny if I used this word. There is a whole community of non-Muslim Indonesian speakers who do not use this word because they aren't Muslim.

On the other hand a lot of Muslims in Indonesia (close to 90% of Indonesians are Muslim) use this word in specific settings (it's not that prevalent in daily conversations). Therefore there's absolutely some value in putting it in the course yet it must be emphasized that it is not used everywhere and rarely used if you're not a Muslim.

I suggest it be put in a lesson with spiritual and religious words.

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/arielkbt

I disagree. This is totally a general greeting in Indonesia. Everyone says this on the daily, even non-Muslims. Lots of Indonesians who are not Muslim use Islamic expressions (like yah allah, alhamdulilah, maashallah, etc) in daily conversation (just like lots of English speakers who are not religious say oh my god and Jesus Christ).

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelBlackw2

A Indonesian friend of mine said some of the words in this course are for Muslims only. (this is true in her context) Some Muslims take offence when they're used by non Muslims. That doesn't mean they shouldn't be in the course, but possibly not before some real basic greetings like Halo!

When they do get taught, as the other guy suggested, maybe in a religious section with other greetings like shalom.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JimMacFly

I live in Bali and i absolutely never hear it. Of course Bali is the part of Indonesia with the least amount of muslims, but I believe it shows well that this is used in areas where Muslims are predominant.

Then again, for me who lived in the Middle East before, I know what it means but it's not Bahasa, it's Arabic. So even if it is important when addressing muslims in Indonesia, it is Arabic and not used everywhere in the country so I guess it could have a lot less importance in the course than being a fundamental.

August 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Stardoch

I guess it depends on the environment and the person. You're absolutely correct that in some environments even non-Muslims use it, probably they live their whole life with a Muslim majority and they are used to hear it.

August 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JoelBlackw2

Great idea. As a Christian I must use shalom. I like knowing this word (and similar) but I shouldn’t use it in my context.

August 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob790395

It does accept good day now as that's what I put

November 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jake64246

As a person who travelled the country across and spoke to locals on daily basis for half a year, never heard the assa-sth word. I'm in the group to include it in 'religious' as it seems to have such origins. (+ I was thought a language in Indonesia on non Muslim university..)

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Sundoro1

I'm seriously considering giving up on the greetings module. I'm using this program to review my Indonesian before my next trip and thought it best to work my way through it from the start. The greetings module though has serious problems, with many interpretations which seem quite incorrect.

As well, I'm particularly concerned about the inclusion of "assalamualaikum" and "waalaikumsalam". Not because they are Arabic, since many Arabic words have been incorporated to expand the Bahasa Melayu which Bahasa Indonesia is based on (along with Dutch and English words). But because a non-native speaker will never have occasion to use these words. I've travelled all through Indonesia for many years and have never heard these words used at all. I don't doubt that they may be common between some Indonesians but, by their nature, they will never be used with a non-native speaker (with the obvious exception of an Arabic speaker, who will be familiar with them anyway).

There is thus simply no place for them in this course, and certainly not at this level. I wonder how many people have gotten to this point, come across these words, and decided not to proceed any further because of there difficulty and incongruity?

December 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/arielkbt

As a nonnative speaker who lived in Indonesia for two years, I heard and used Arabic greetings and expressions on a daily basis.

December 9, 2018
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