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  5. "Dia keluar dari pasar."

"Dia keluar dari pasar."

Translation:She comes out of the market.

August 19, 2018

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anno35

doesn't 'keluar' mean 'exit'? If it does, then she exits the market should be enough


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catencode

iya, Keluar is commonly used on Exit signs in Indonesia and Malaysia. but since this is in Beta it will not accept many translations -- yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qZzR1d1d

Could it also say ‘she leaves the market’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoJaviUnlam

Etymology [keluar]

ke +‎ luar

Verb

keluar

1) to go out, to get out, to exit

2) to emerge, to show up

Kapal selam itu keluar dari samudera.

The submarine emerged from the ocean.

3) to be announced

4) to retire

5) to take (s.th.) out

6) to remove

7) to discharge (an employee)

8) to issue (a ticket etc.)

9) to produce

Synonyms

(to emerge, to come up) muncul, sembul, tongol

Source: Wiktionary

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/keluar

https://id.wiktionary.org/wiki/keluar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mehki227

Why was I marked wrong for "he"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmPulse2

"She comes out from the market" should at the least be correct (dari is from).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sumsel1

While that may be a more literal translation, it would not sound like a proper english sentence though. To me at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noel397061

"She comes out of the market." is not entirely correct here. Perhaps it is better to say "She/He exits the market."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radis___

Why is 'she comes out of a market' wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lexi0214

Could this also be "she is coming from the market"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate984809

No - that would be "dia datang dari pasar"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sumsel1

Dia datang dari pasar. I think it would be slightly different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisa-Lisa-Lisa

the way it is written is sounds like (she has come out from the market). not She comes out of the market


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottFento3

I believe that in many languages, English included, certain verbs are largely paired with certain prepositions. Here, "keluar dari" where we might say "go out of." In English, for example, you have to "ask for an apple" when you want to request an apple==>ask [direct object; e.g., "someone"] for [sort of indirect object, here, object of a preposition; e.g., "something"]. Compare that to "request 'something' from 'someone'."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottFento3

My Indonesian language teacher explained to me that "keluar" has a slightly different meaning from, say, "berangkat" or other Indonesian verbs that we would look at largely as synonyms. "Keluar' means simply to go out [from somewhere]. "Pergi," for example, is even more simple in the sense of just going with no particular destination implied. "Berangkat" means to leave with a destination very much implied, hence you would see this at the airport. I would welcome native Indonesian speakers correcting my understanding.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SherleneKl

she goes outside from the market - not accepted. Why?

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