"मुझे मेरी किताब दो।"

Translation:Give me my book.

August 22, 2018

17 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blahblahblee

This should use अपनी instead of मेरी should it not? Or would that leave who's book it is undetermined?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M_A_Ashraf

मुझे अपनी किताब दो - Give me your book
मुझे मेरी किताब दो - Give me my book
उसे उसकी किताब दो - Give him his book
उसे अपनी किताब दो - Give him your book

अपनी is a reflexive pronoun that always refers back to the subject of the sentence. Since the subject of an imperative sentence is You, अपनी means 'your' in an imperative sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blahblahblee

Never said thank you. Thank you! Very clear explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fun_Bucket

Why doesn't "give my book to me" work as a correct translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kzamzow12

I agree and I reported it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnUnicorn

Does this not use अपकी because the implied subject is "you"?

(And does that mean a "use your own thing!" command would take अपकी without an antecedent? Like would "read your own book!" be 'अपकी किताब पढ़ो!'?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OJFord

Assuming you mean अपनी (न, not क), yes, exactly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/V2Blast

Neither Hindi nor English generally includes the subject (being commanded/told to do something) in the sentence.

Not sure about your second question, but I think so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ganishk

Difference between Two and Give(not detha) in Hindi for दो


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OJFord

They happen to have the same spelling yes, but clearly they're different words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ganishk

Yeah I am asking in what aspect they are.

Like in a sentence where both of them exists. i.e. Take two apples from her


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OJFord

In the sense of 'two' it's not a verb; so it doesn't have an aspect.

As the verb 'give', whether imperative ('give her apples') or subjunctive ('you are to give her apples'), the दो conjugation is non-aspectual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ganishk

Oh!OK thanks,Got it, I don't know whether the sentence with both of them exists or not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OJFord

Sure, you could say 'give (whoever) two (whatever)' and it'd have both - किसी दो बात दो - but maybe it sounds a little strange/awkward and unless deliberately poetic/for a song a native speaker might use another word for the देना one? I'm just speculating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viv1891
  1. Root form of "give" is "De" whose imperative form is " Do".
  2. I understand your confusion between two and give since both are " Do"
  3. Understood your question and slightly modifying it... how do you say .... "give two apples to sb"... it is .... Use/ Ise do (two) seb de do (give).
  4. The conflict is clarified by adding a "de" before "do" but at times it may be given a miss. In those cases the context and in

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akshaysindhu027

Isnt it 'dena' root word of 'do'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OJFord

देना is the infinitive yes, but Viv is right that the 'root' is दे। In general, infinitive = root + ना।

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