"Dia berdiri dan berjalan."

Translation:He stands up and walks.

August 23, 2018

14 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qZzR1d1d

Would ‘he stands and walks’ also work?

Also can anyone explain why you need a ‘ber’ in the first place, what is the difference between ‘Saya jalan’ and ‘Saya berjalan’? It wasn’t clear to me in the intro...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rick392366

Also can anyone explain why you need a ‘ber’ in the first place, what is the difference between ‘Saya jalan’ and ‘Saya berjalan’? It wasn’t clear to me in the intro...

(ber-) + (noun) = verb
jalan (noun)
berjalan (verb)

The word "jalan" is a noun, so it needs the ber- prefix to use it as a verb (in the formal way).

https://kbbi.web.id/jalan

"Saya jalan" is informal.
The word "jalan" is used as a verb in this sentence.
As you can see in the dictionary, it's only used as a verb in the informal way.

That's the reason the ber- prefix is used here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qZzR1d1d

Thanks, also useful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1CN5ijzC

the prefix "ber-" on "berjalan" to reinforce to that we are currently "jalan" / walking

if you are interested in (a very long) explanation about prefix and suffix you can see here: http://indodic.com/affixeng.html or just google it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleMa445890

I believe "he stands and walks" would work, but duolingo detects is as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeHF

Indeed. It's started off with only "stands up" sentences being accepted; I think for every "stands" sentence, we need to use the report button to get them accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anno35

why isn't, 'he stands and walks' acceptable? The 'up' is not necessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeHF

I guess the contributors had not considered that option. The course is still in Beta, so we need to use the report button to get the additional ways of saying things marked as correct.

I think the majority of the course contributors are native Indonesian speakers rather than native English speakers; and when they listed the possible correct translations the "stands" options got left out - I suspect they might have been taught to use "stands up" as the direct translation of "berdiri" to avoid confusion with "stands still". "Stands" on it's own can mean either, and should be valid here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

So... Berdiri can't mean just "to stand" as in "He is standing over there"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeHF

I'm not sure, to be honest, but when there's a couple of different senses to a word in English, there's often a fair chance that the concepts translate to entirely different words in other languages. Just guessing really.

Edit: I've asked a native speaker, and she said berdiri can be either (duduk -> berdiri and berjalan -> berdiri); so my guess wasn't quite right.

I guess it's more likely they were just taught "stand up" as a combined thing (phrasal verb?), and didn't realise you could just have "stand" on it's own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/connielepa

"he is standing over there" = "dia sedang berdiri di situ" in Indonesian. So, berdiri = to stand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/safir854785

Man really indonesian language is so hard to understanding cause if you real talk with indonesian people they not really using a formal language they already have their own language:(

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