"Saya memanggil nama mereka, yaitu Tono dan Andi."

Translation:I call their names, i.e. Tono and Andi.

August 24, 2018

18 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonnyValst1

I never heard anyone actually say "i.e.". Odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Meta_Taro

Such as, for instance, namely, that is. "i.e" is only for writing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lili114354

oh no, i've definitely heard it. i'm one of those who does say it out loud.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glhaynes90

"Namely" is another possible translation for yaitu.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vemmv

"Which are" would be fitting in this context too, I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joohannn

What’s i.e.?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arkonide

I.e. stands for the Latin id est = in other words. I agree with cafe_disco that it is used more frequently in written English. E.g. on the other hand means exempli gratia = for example.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cafe_disco

It means "that is...". You'd say it before clarifying a statement, but it's used more in writing than spoken dialogue. Here's an example I found on Wiktionary:

"The three U.S. states on the west coast (i.e., Washington, Oregon, and California) have mild seasonal variations in temperature (i.e., warm winters and cool summers)."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/equalizer538

Id est (Latin for "that is")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/equalizer538

Indonesian Duolingo is so messed up, all the wrong English translation and odd sentences that we've never heard in real life, it's driving me nuts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pigsqueak

Every native English speaker understands "that is ..." but quite a few don't know what i.e. means. As others have stated, i.e. is much more common in writing than everyday conversations.

Is yaitu commonly used in conversations? Would most Indonesians understand it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apsukma

in some regions, "yaitu" is not commonly used in daily conversation. other regions may vary. but yes, most indonesians will understand it because "yaitu" is very common in books, documents, letters, newspapers, speeches, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Origin5world5_

In Arabic we also use it much, we say 'yaini'. It means 'that means', but you can translate it as: that is to say..., I mean..., for example..., namely...

We use it a lot. The Indonesian 'yaitu' seems comparative to me. Every sentence with yaitu until now I could easily interchange it with the Arabic 'yaini'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KyrieDomineJesus

Is memanggil used to give a name to something ("I called=named my new dog Kipples") or only to get someone's attention ("He turned to me when I called=yelled his name") or both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DewiGwen

I typed "that is" instead of i.e. and it wasn't accepted although we know both are correct translation at least according to Duo I reported it and I agree the sentences awkward in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/__CF__

stylistically, "so" is better than "i.e." here, but it was not accepted.

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