"Die Schwester mag Schweizer Autoren."

Translation:The sister likes Swiss authors.

March 30, 2013

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davoskan

If "mögen" requires acusative, and "Autoren" is plural, why can't it be: "Die Schwester mag Schweizere Autoren"?

June 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

"Schweizer" is an uninflected adjective: "die Schweizer Autoren, der Schweizer Autoren, den Schweizer Autoren, die Schweizer Autoren". BTW: your question has already been answered above.

June 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hutcho66

Wouldn't 'Autor' inflect though? die Schweizer Autorin, der Schweizer Autor etc.?

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Of course. I was only talking about the adjective.

August 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoAl2

does this apply to all nationalities as well??

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Assuming "this" refers to capitalization: No, only if the word ends in 'er', see the link I posted in a comment below.

March 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoAl2

umm no actually I meant "Schweizer" being uninflected, does that apply to all nationalities? cause I've never encountered it before.

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

No, this is a special case.

  • Die Schwester mag Schweizer Autoren (acc)
  • Die Schwester mag niederländische Autoren (acc)
  • Die Schwester hilft Schweizer Autoren (dat)
  • Die Schwester hilft niederländischen Autoren (dat)
  • Die Schwester gedenkt Schweizer Autoren (gen)
  • Die Schwester gedenkt niederländischer Autoren (gen)
  • Das sind Schweizer Autoren (nom)
  • Das sind niederländische Autoren (nom)
April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hutcho66

Yeah, though so, was just scared I missed some weird grammar exception of something!

August 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeBeton

duolingo says its a noun

June 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

It can be a noun, but in this case, it's definitely an adjective because it modifies a noun. The dictionary doesn't really understand context. Take everything it says with a grain of salt and double-check with a traditional dictionary.

http://en.pons.com/translate/german-english/schweizer

June 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeBeton

I'm definitely not knocking you , it's just I wish Duolingo could improve it to stop confusion (??) Anyway thank you for the help :)

June 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

Christian, wann ändert ihr 'Schweizer' in 'schweizer' um?

April 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Procrastinans

Schweizer is a noun acting as an adjective? How does this work?

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

It's an adjective. See here: http://www.duden.de/sprachwissen/rechtschreibregeln/gross-und-kleinschreibung#K90 rule 90. In short: words ending in 'er' and derived from geographical names are always capitalized. http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/Schweizer_aus_der_Schweiz

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Procrastinans

Good to know. And from this example and those which you've linked to, they also don't decline for case or gender/number?

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Exactly. But you have to be careful since the corresponding nouns like 'der Schweizer' which look very much alike do get inflected.

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guenthjm

I used the word nun (admittedly for the sake of being somewhat contrary) instead of sister. The definition lists nun as a valid translation for Schwester. Is there something I'm missing?

January 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

It's fine but without further context Germans wouldn't probably interpret it that way. The most common meaning of "Schwester" is "sister". The standard translation for "nun" is "die Nonne", but nuns are also commonly referred to as "Schwestern" (as in members of a sisterhood).

January 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davideduardopuga

No one would say "the sister" in English when refering to a sibling.

February 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siebenundzwanzig

"Which sister do you mean?"

"The sister over there." ... "The sister who's wearing [thing]." ... "The sister/one that's laughing."

"Is that the sister you meant?"

"Is that the sister with whom you're engaged?"

Etc.

April 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EntropyMan

Swing & jazz musician Tommy Dorsey used to refer to his brother Jimmy Dorsey as "the brother", so it might be a specifically Irish usage.

May 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lissybeth91

I call my family "the father," "the mother," "the brother" sometimes... Just because I'm weird like that.

July 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J4WNEE

They could also be referring to a nun

March 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Atomic_Sheep

I said black authors haha

March 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaileMalin

Me too! "The sister likes black authors." In this case I was actually relieved that I wrong.

April 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pandatiger87

why is it not "the Swiss authors" and just "Swiss authors"?

April 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyla_bifurca

Because there's no definite article on "Schweizer Autoren", only on "Die Schwester". It could be any Swiss authors.

April 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrsBlakeney

I remember Schwester also being used to mean nurse (as a short form of Krankenschwester). Is this wrong? Or does it reflect more of a British English where sisters work in hospitals and nurses care for infants?

December 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

You are right. Without context it's just not the most natural interpretation. If you report it, it will be added.

December 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/notnebyhtak

Couldn't Schwester mean the nurse or the sister? Why is nurse the wrong answer?

March 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

Why does Schweizer need to be capitalised? It's an adjective, not a noun.

May 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

so is there a difference (even just in nuance) between the indeclinable Schweizer and the declinable schwietzerisch. Also, are all (or most of) the -er nouns of geographical provenance also adjectives? E.g. I know there are Italiener and Spanier. Are those adjectives too?

December 23, 2014
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