"Du bist praktisch meine Schwester."

Translation:You are practically my sister.

March 30, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahmedwm2
<h1>Friendzoned</h1>
June 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blackno1

is the translation really "practically"? Is it not "practical"?

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demyan-uz

It is probably because there is no address to the sister as the address would be separated by a comma

July 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndreaJuniper

Praktisch can mean both practically and practical depending on the context. Same with words like definitiv and komplett - they can be used as adverbs

November 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OtavioZ

Can be the both depending on the context... at least i think so. haha

April 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Du bist praktisch meine Schwester. You are virtually my sister. (nominative) Du bist praktisch, meine Schwester. You are practical, (my) sister. (vocative)

What a difference a comma makes.

December 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HCDaria

Yeah, I had the listening exercise, and I thought I heard a pause. Hence, I put a comma between "praktisch" and "meine." xD Luckily for me, Duo still counted it as correct.

January 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiefOrloth

I understand the English answer to be synonymous with "You are, to all intents and purposes, my sister" or "You are virtually my sister" (which was not accepted as correct). Is this also true of the original German sentence?

October 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saccarozy

I am not sure I got the idea here :)

September 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonVBlack

How confusing that practical and practically are the same word...

August 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
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German never discriminates between adjectives and adverbs. That's why Germans learning English often don't know when to put a "-ly" ending to a word. Even "good" and "well" are both "gut" in German.

August 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cassandora

I don't know if this is enough buy when I hear her say it, she emphasises Schwester, not praktisch. If the sister was practical she woud have emphasised the word praktisch...no?

September 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judderwocky

This seems more like its being used as an adverb, not an adjective in the English.

October 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marius145268

Ew, that's gross, you're my stepsister!

July 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amglady

That was a handful to say

September 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin676605

I don't know what that sentence means.

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnnyKane1

...words you don't want to say/hear on your wedding day

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrGonzoDK

Bißt was correct when I went to school?

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HCDaria

I started learning German ten years ago, and your comment was the first time I've seen "Bißt" (for what it's worth...)

January 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Blomeley

its difficult to see how praktisch here is an adjective

April 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dr.crane0908

Especially since it's an adverb here.

June 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wern234

Why is the translation "Practically you are my sister" not accepted?

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lexht

I guess because German and English have similar semantic uses of word order (where it is not fixed), so you're better off staying as close as possible to the word order given.

October 2, 2016
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