"Inzwischen wird es dunkel."

Translation:It is getting dark in the mean time.

March 30, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SelphieB

I put "By that time it will be dark", but it was rejected, in favour of "By that time it is becoming dark". The english there seems to be off to me....'by that time' is referring to the future, whereas 'it is becoming dark' refers to something that is occuring in the present.

March 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/amyb24

I put exactly the same answer that you did--so I'm in agreement.

April 10, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio

Both sentences are in the present tense: "wird es dunkel" and "it is getting dark." By contrast, "it will be dark" is future tense. In context, the difference could matter. For example: "I am standing here waiting for the light to change, but it is getting dark in the meantime."

April 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems

I believe this sentence "Inzwischen wird es dunkel" can be translated into future in English. German often uses the present tense when referring to the future if the sentence has a word in it that indicates the future (like Morgen, Samstag...). If Inzwischen is being used as "By that time" then it indicates future. I would think "By that time it will be dark" is an acceptable answer based on my masterful grasp of German. (Yeah, right.)
Hopefully a native speaker will add to this.

April 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio

Hmm. I'd make a distinction in English (I don't know about the German) between

"It is getting dark" [I'm standing here, and it's dusk; OR the lights are dimming, so somebody should correct the problem and make it bright again]

and

"It will be dark" [If I'm still here, or even if it isn't, at some point in the future it will be dark.]

Each indicates a stage in a process, but not the same stage. And if it's in the present tense, depending on the circumstances, the process may stop or even be reversed--it may never get dark.

April 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems

I guess it depends on how "Inzwischen" gets translated. Now, after checking Pons and Beolingus, "By that time" (offered by Duo) doesn't seem to be a translation. All offered translations seem to be "in the meantime", "since", "by now"....which means the sentence would not indicate future and I'm going to start to back pedal....

April 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/SelphieB

Exactly, I think it is different depending on how you translate 'inzwischen'.

April 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo

Is it ok to spell "mean time" instead of "meantime" in English?

April 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio

No. "Meantime," like "meanwhile," is always one word. "Mean time" is something else--it refers to measures of solar time, such as "Greenwich Mean Time."

April 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/igb

What would be wrong with "Meanwhile it has become dark" ?

May 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo

Wrong tense. "Wird" can be translated as "will" or "will be" meaning the future or as "is getting" meaning the present. It has nothing to do with perfect tenses.

May 4, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Gustav_Lauben

Okay, but what is wrong with "In the meanwhile it will be dark"?

June 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Soglio

Usually, "meanwhile" is used as an adjective, not as a noun--so you'd say "meanwhile" or "in the meantime" but not "in the meanwhile."

Also, "meanwhile it will be dark" is a little awkward in English. It implies that between now and then ("then" being the end time of "meanwhile") it will get dark, but then get light again.

June 30, 2013
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