https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SadDude34

Help with learning Hiragana?

Hello, I was looking for some advice on how to memorize Hiragana. I felt like writing each symbol over and over again until I memorize them wouldn't be the best way to go about it, so I was looking for lists of simple words in Romanji that I could rewrite in Hiragana. I did that yesterday and memorized a few symbols more, but I haven't been able to find more resources to do that again. If someone could provide a list of words like I described, or has a more effective method to do so it'd be vey nice. Thanks in advance <3

ps: here's the page I was using yesterday, I only did excercise 1 because the rest are too challenging for me at the moment. http://www.guidetojapanese.org/learn/grammar/hiragana_ex

September 7, 2018

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

My favorite hirgana resource is Tofugu's Ultimate Hiragana guide. It provides mneumonics to help you recall each character and writing drills for practice.

https://www.tofugu.com/japanese/learn-hiragana/

Drag n Drop Hiragana is a simple and fun way to test yourself.

https://www.csus.edu/indiv/s/sheaa/projects/genki/hiragana-timer.html

And once you are ready, RealKana is another great drilling option

https://m.realkana.com/hiragana/

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

Personally, I'd say writing them over and over is better for learning the hiragana than writing words with them. But I mean writing out the "fifty sounds table", not something like writing a single symbol a hundred times then moving on to the next one.

 aiueo aiueo
_あいうえお アイウエオ
かきくけこ カキクケコ
さしすせそ サシスセソ
たちつてと タチツテト
なにぬねの ナニヌネノ
はひふへほ ハヒフヘホ
まみむめも マミムメモ
や ゆ よ ヤ ユ ヨ
らりるれろ ラリルレロ
 を ワ 
  ん     ン

There are other things you can do to help learn kana besides just writing them. There are kana memorisation games you can play for free on websites. The following one is pretty decent and is fun:

https://www.kongregate.com/games/tukkun/kana-warrior

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas_Wesley

Personally, I found writing them out until I memorized all of them to be very helpful, but perhaps that's not everyone's cup of tea...

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesHein

Take it from someone who usually sucks at memorizing things like that: mnemonics are your friends! There's a ton of charts all over the internet (just search "hiragana mnemonics"), take a look at some and find what's best for you. It may be hard to see a cow in む, but once you do, you'll not forget that they go "moo". Try some tinycards too, they're great to memorize stuff. Good luck.

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baerghest

You might want to have a look at this as well: it is a guide to doing the brushstrokes right if you ever write with anything more sensitive than a pencil. https://namakajiri.net/nikki/hiragana-stroke-ends/

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Radhe1o8

I was completely new to Hiragana until recently, and I was able to memorize it easily using a simple technique: I created a connection between each character and a word or something that the character reminded me of. For example “te” looks like a table to me. “mi” looks like the combination of my first and last (maiden) name initials JH, thus it is me. “ki looks like a key. Whatever you come up with only has to make sense to you. Whenever I would see a character again, I would try to remember what I had come up with before. If I couldn’t remember it, then I would think of something new that really reminded of the character.

I had a lot of fun with this method, and I reviewed the letters from each of the four Duolingo lessons on Japanese letters daily for about two weeks. Now I feel confident with the Hiragana script (I have never practiced writing but I can read it). Best of luck!

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaigeBarber59

I would just continue with some practice! I've memorized it by changing the kana to sometimes look like the letters they are in English or even making small stories with the characters. Sounds stupid, but it helps!

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisCage78

I used these cards when I started japanese, it helped a lot: https://tinycards.duolingo.com/decks/v9Cv1Ky/hiragana-sound-mnemonics

Some of them won't help you but it's a pretty good start.

September 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marton_1

I have the hiragana list, but i can't memorize it. Thanks for the link!

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hao508762

Thank you so much, it's very useful

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsolaCiao

You could try searching for hiragana worksheets for kids.

Education.com worksheets

If you're up for a challenge you can search for hiragana worksheets that Japanese kids use.

Happy Lilac worksheets

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Em-jiGreen

stay the heck away from romaji !!! (no kidding its a hinderance) dr moku has an app for your very problem where you associate the different characters with things you already know.

す becomes SUperman SwOOping into action, the app is great but its possible to make your own associations :)

がんばる。

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

I disagree about avoiding romaji entirely. I think it can serve a valuable purpose, by lowering the barrier to entry for new learners and making Japanese more accessible. Japanese is already hard enough. You don't have to make it even harder by actively avoiding any resource that uses romaji. You will want to move on from it as soon as you are able (and start learning kanji), but relying on romaji for a little while won't hurt your progress or stunt your Japanese education somehow.

I think of it like "training wheels" or "floaties". You need to take off the training wheels eventually or you start to look really silly. And you won't really know how to ride a bike until you can do it without trainers. But you should not be ashamed to use all the tools at your disposal, early on, when you are still new and finding your balance.

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/testmoogle

I'm strongly against romaji. From my experience I'd say it does cause learners a fair bit of harm.

Still, as much as I dislike romaji, I wouldn't say it's necessary to avoid it completely either; because, after people have gotten out of their romaji phase, they should eventually be able to undo all the damage romaji caused anyway.

What I always find amusing though, is the irony that the vast majority of those who tell everyone to stay away from romaji actually use romaji themselves when typing Japanese characters on their computer keyboards! :P

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DestinyCall

I understand the rationale behind switching to hiragana as soon as you can manage the transition. And I do think that you can get into trouble if you linger in the "romaji phase" too long out of laziness or fear of kana/kanji. You can end up learning bad study habits, poor pronunciation, and have more trouble "thinking in Japanese."

But ... I think that only really becomes a problem when you rely on romaji too much and let yourself stall out. As a transitionary step, it shouldn't make any real difference to your long-term success.

Avoiding romaji as an absolute beginner is difficult and, in my opinion, completely unnecessary. The important thing is to keep challenging yourself and push forward into hiragana, katakana, and kanji quickly.

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VossBucci

I totally agree. I used Pinyin for Chinese characters and it never hindered my learning at all. Now I can read easily without Pinyin and have reached HSK 4 (B2). I don't see how this method would hinder Japanese reading skills.

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VossBucci

You should buy the box of Kana cards by White Rabbit Press. I bought them on Amazon some years ago and they're brilliant :-)

Have a look on the website: www.whiterabbitpress.com

September 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarriorFox4ever

Maybe get you should Rosetta Stone. It could help!! Have a wonderful day!!

September 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaserDuck

I memorised hiragana and katakana through a lot of practice. For kanji, I use mnemonics and so far I have memorised about 200 kanji so I suppose mnemonics might work for hiragana as well. One that I thought about is の-no. It kind of looks like these "smoking is not allowed" signs so maybe you can memorise it as; can I smoke here? NO!

September 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SadDude34

Thanks everyone for the advice! I didn't expect to get this much help, I'll try some of the techniques that you shared with me and share some of my progress soon. Thank you c:

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scocasso

What I did was to make cards with each letter on them, and the pronunciation on the back. I would then do a three-row system with 7 cards per row. Take your deck of cards and start testing yourself. Each one you get correct is discarded. Each one you get wrong is put in the first row until there are 7. Then start testing on the cards. Each time I got a card correct it would move along the row one space, and when I got it incorrect, it would move back to the very start of the first row. When it reached the end of the row, it would move down and I would add another card from the deck. Whenever I got one wrong, it went back to the beginning of the first row. So, when a card finally makes it to the end of the third row, when it moves one more space forward, it is out - it has been learnt.

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ngoctuan0110

Hello the world!

September 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonTheLegend

What I did to learn both Hiragana and Katakana was using the apps "Hiragana Pro" and "Katakana Pro". Then I spent like a few hours writing them on Hiragana Charts. At that point I had them pretty much memorized. Afterwards I just googled a bunch of random Japanese stuff and practiced reading them. Hope this helps :/

September 18, 2018
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