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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

"Da würde ich nicht so sehr sparen."

March 30, 2013

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Shouldn't it be "so viel sparen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilygilder

That sounds unfinished and therefore more colloquial. The full sentence would be: "Da würde ich nicht so viel Geld sparen." Because viel refers to a noun like Geld (money) or Zeit (time).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Thank you. That makes sense. What about the original--"Da würde ich nicht so sehr sparen." Is "sehr" correct there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hans_Allein

I've never heard the word 'scrimp' in all my born days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Really? It's common in my part of the world. However, I haven't heard the phrase "in all my born days" in many a year. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hans_Allein

Which part of the world are people scrimping on a daily basis?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Most of it, I would think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hans_Allein

I think it's only really used in the US and the darkest regions of Scotland these days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Well, the US is a big place. I can't speak for the darkest regions of Scotland.

I've been singing the Beatles' "When I'm 64" since we spoke. Couldn't figure out why, until I hit the line "We shall scrimp and save." ;-)

The people for whom this was an anthem are now 64 or so, however, so it may be before your time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Well, this is taking an ugly turn. ;-)

Seriously, though, "scrimp" isn't wholly synonymous with "save." Rather, "scrimp" is along the lines of penurious, penny-pinching, or, as an old expression went, "Squeezing a nickel until the buffalo screams."

I'm not sure all that is included in "sparen." My take on the sentence is that it could be at home in a range of contexts--for example, "He got a big discount for being an employee; I'd get a small discount, but I wouldn't save as much as he did."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

@Hohenems: très charmant! Really! ;-) @Soglio: 'sparen' is rather neutral in German (like 'save' in English). The idea of 'penny-pinching' is better conveyed with the verb 'knausern' which bears a strong negative connotation. Even stronger is 'geizen'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hohenems

Used in Canada too. Although I don't think I've heard anyone under 50 really use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hohenems

@ Wataya - Did I say something insulting? I'm confused. I wasn't implying anyone was old if they used "scrimp". It just seems to have fallen out of use around here.
@ Soglio - If there was some confusion, I wasn't indirectly (or directly) trying to call you old. Just pointing out that "scrimp" has fallen by the wayside.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

@Hohenems: no, of course you didn't. I was just joking and keeping Soglio's ball rolling ;-) I don't think anyone got your remark the wrong way. Everything's fine ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

@ Hohenems: Not to worry. I was just joking, as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

@ Wataya: Thanks. I don't think scrimp is necessarily pejorative; sorry if I implied that. In a context in which money is tight and thrift is a virtue, it might be positive. Are "knausern" and "geizen" pejorative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

Yes, 'knausern' and 'geizen' are both used pejoratively. If you want a more positive connotation, you could use 'sich etwas von etwas absparen'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Thank you! That's a good range of terms to have handy.

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