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"Where do we go for dinner?"

Translation:我们到哪儿吃晚饭?

September 11, 2018

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinThor

So is this literally "we to where eat dinner?"? So far I only know 到 from the "from ... to" construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonTe1

The ' 到 ' character also appeared in a previous lesson for getting directions. My understanding is that it also means "to go to" or "to get to". In the 从..到 construction, it's like saying from 7 and going to 9.

https://www.duolingo.com/skill/zs/Location-3/tips https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/25275082

https://chinese.yabla.com/chinese-english-pinyin-dictionary.php?define=%E5%88%B0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carroyoc

What happen if instead of 到 we use 去, will it sounds weird ? is it incorrect? Is there any reason you should use it or because of the region?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronwynRic1

Is 我们去哪儿吃晚饭?ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill496592

So can 哪儿 come after 吃晚饭? Just wondering


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rajul285485

Adverb precedes verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverHollenbach

我们在哪儿吃晚饭?Not literally "go for dinner" but should be a perfectly acceptable translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarGrrrl

Hmmm. Years ago I was taught the way to say "to go to" (someplace) was "to (someplace) go". E.g. 你到哪儿去? = "To where are you going?", i.e. in regular English "where are you going?".

But I tried several sentences about going to places using Google translate, and they all came back with just ”去” functioning by itself as ”go to”, rather than as the "go" element in a "to .. somewhere... go" ("到 ... somewhere... 去") construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BronwynRic1

I use Google translate and reverse the translation to be sure it means what I think it means. However Google translate has limitations for teaching language. Look for the community tick next to translation to have more confidence in the translation given. It really works on frequency of requests to translate and usually gives the simplest and not necessarily most accurate translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretBr689808

我们到哪儿吃完饭? Is it correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanRasm

吃完饭 chīwán fàn means 'finish eating'. You want 吃晚饭 chī wǎnfàn 'eat dinner'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lims41

I must have missed the rule that place comes before action?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrLaFo808

Why is it not acceptable to use hui回? Which does mean "to go".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RixMorales

回 literally means "return" or "come back". You don't "return" to where you're from when you're looking for a place to have dinner, you "go out" of your place to look for somewhere to eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

Is there no verb for "go" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rajul285485

I think dao also means 'to reach'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NasuSamaruk0

Even though "go" does not appear in the given sentence, the translation either with or without 去 before 吃晚饭 is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuyaC

Is it really wrong without 到 ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverHollenbach

You just need a verb between subject and location. Could be 在 (at, in), 去(go), 到 (arrive). 都可以!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuyaC

Oh I see, then that would mean "Where do we go/arrive for dinner?"
But without the 到 it would still make sense and mean:
"Where do we eat dinner?"
Is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverHollenbach

Yes but then you would still need 在, you can’t just say ”我们哪儿吃晚饭”。I think the difference between those verbs is subtle and it’s more to do with Chinese speaking habits rather than a literal word by word translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kuyaC

Ye thanks, I meant with 在 also


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RixMorales

Is it also correct to say "我们在哪儿吃晚饭?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakurakrys

The zai is used to describe a place and isn't generally used as a verb. So it would translate more closely to 'where are we eating' (or literally we are where eat dinner) rather than 'where are we going to eat'. I don't agree with using dao and was taught to use qu instead.

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