https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Becoming Fluent

Tips 1.Visit your local library and check out some little kid books in French 2.After a while you may want to try to read some more mature books. 3.Everyday learn a new word. I think Duolingo should have a word of the day in French and all the other languages. This will help to expand your vocabulary.

If you like this idea then please up vote this discussion.

4 years ago

164 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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If fluency is your goal, you should be aiming at a minimum active vocabulary of around 5000 words (estimates vary wildly -- this is near the low end). At one word a day, this would take you around 14 years. I would advise you to find a spaced repetition program that you like (Anki is my preferred choice) and aim to acquire at least 10 words per day.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SavvySalamander

Although I agree with the idea of a large working vocabulary, understanding verb conjugation and tenses (at least the basic ones) are - in my opinion - more important than a amassing a large vocabulary in the beginning. Obviously the more words you know, the better you can communicate though. ^_^ I just think that words are much easier to pick up and/memorise than getting things like irregular verbs right in unfamiliar tenses. In regards to fluency; immersion is best. If you can't live and breathe french for a while, do your best to simulate it with stuff like duolingo and tons of french films and books. When you start thinking in another language, then you're on your way!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

Interestingly, I find the opposite to be true. I'm sure it's an individual thing, but for people such as myself who pick up verbs easily and struggle with nouns, apps like the ones being suggested here, that focus on teaching those nouns, are invaluable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SavvySalamander

Huh, that is interesting! Perhaps you're right, maybe it is an individual thing. I started learning french in high school and went overseas with it a bit, but haven't studied or spoken it in about 4 years and inevitably have found myself forgetting a lot of what I had learnt. It's possible that I find vocabulary comes back to me more quickly than verb conjugation because some tenses are conjugated very similarly, so it's hard to remember which is which! I guess in the end though, in order to communicate, knowing the words is better than knowing how to say them and not know the words you need for that particular sentence!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maddyis7

Differing opinions on here, but I'm with you on this one. My vocabulary is getting quite large, but if I could master (get half-fluent) on the basic conjugations, I'd feel more than happy. I find I need exposure to the irregular verbs, more than to vocabulary. It seems to me that most of the most-commonly used verbs are irregular - Essere, Stare, Fare (In the Italian, I'm learning) and I think it's the same in French and English....Possibly all languages.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindakanga
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One good explanation of why the most used verbs are irregular - that sounds a bell of truth for me - is that ... As a word is used more frequently - people change it slightly - they 'play' with it - it develops new trends of slightly different pronunciations (and often also meanings). This happens unconsciously , over time, in different communities at different times, and has been happening before even written language was a norm.
So the more high use a word is - the more likely it will not follow a normal spelling pattern - as a general rule.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOCal
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There are only 5 irregular verbs in Japanese, and they are not very irregular. sigh

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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Absolutely -- I didn't mean to imply that amassing a large vocabulary is sufficient for fluency, only that it's necessary (along with several other things). I just thought it would be useful to put some numbers on the probable effectiveness of "a word a day" as a strategy.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VossBucci
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I love verb conjugations! :-) Whenever I start a new language, I pick the top ten most used verbs and learn how to conjugate them. I find this helps me to start actually speaking much sooner. :-)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swampy35
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I agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diacagr

I am watching "Extra en Francais", it is a tv series, it is fun, it lasts about 20 minutes, and it is designed for french learners. Does anybody know a fun French TV series?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wyeager84
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I watched Les Revenants on Netflix. They speak so fast, but tons of good dialog and the story kept me tuned in all series.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noxfarm01

J'aime bien Les Revenants. Bien qu'ils parlent vite, je pense qu'ils parlent trés clairement. J'ai pu comprendre beaucoup de mots et certaines de phrases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maxnewell
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Les Revenants is great. It's also quite a surprise, since while France has a long tradition of excellent feature-length cinema, its original television programs are usually awful.

Netflix is very irritating, though, in that it still embeds the subtitles in the image instead of making it metadata that can be turned on or off. When I watch in French, I really don't want subtitles, because I use them, despite not wanting to.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CLeVasseur24

I am also watching this show. It is pretty good, but they speak to fast for me as I am just stating out. The only thing I can pick up is when they say Oui or Merci. haha

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icundell

I watched Les Revenants for the second time just recently and found that now, although I still need to use subtitles if I wanted to follow the story closely, if I was using it as an exercise I could pick up patterns and grammatical structures and even the odd bit of slang and a couple of choce swearwords ;). Not enough to simultaneous translate, so to speak, (not even close!) but very encouraging in terms of showing some progress in being able to follow stuff.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindakanga
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Here is a post that was made about french movies

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diacagr

Merci! j'ai Netflix ainsi je vais le voir!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oleron3
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donc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Ta Oleron3 - I was wondering what had prompted you to prefer donc as internet info varies greatly from all three being interchangeable to ainsi being really formal and never used in spoken English and every shade in between : )

And thanks also re regarder you are quite right - I didn't even notice vais le voir in diacagr's original post. It often trips me up and yet I know to be careful of that semi-faux ami :)

I cant get netfix in my part of the world :( BUT I was given the DVD of Series One for Mother's Day today...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Hi - do you think donc is better here? I thought that donc and ainsi would be interchangeable in this sentence.

http://french.about.com/od/mistakes/a/then.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oleron3
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Hi, puppy7989. I don't seem to be able to reply to your question, so (donc ;-) ) I have to reply to my own. I said "donc" instinctively, because it sounds more natural to me. I think of "ainsi" as a literary way to write the same thing (similar to "thus"), not as a "connection" one would use in spoken/colloquial French. And, for native speakers of English, it's easier to pronounce "donc" correctly in the flow of conversation without worrying too much about having a perfect accent, thus risking being misunderstood. As about.com explains, "alors" is sometimes acceptable, but it really is too casual for this use, unless your French is perfect and you're messin' around with pals who sling slang.

On a separate note, you might prefer to say ". . .je vais le(s) regarder." . . .even though you will "see" Les Revenants.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G0108

Merci!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielClar16

Le Bar de l'Europe is an interview with a French person every day. It lasts 10 minutes and is on TV5. I find it really useful for listening to speech and also for vocabulary!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diacagr

Je l'aime, merci!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenga_Jane

For my level of French, that show was a bit basic for me. I keep meaning to look up the Spanish version, but I haven't done so yet. Right now I'm focusing on Spanish, so I'm making my way through Avatar: The Last Airbender (in Spanish Avatar: la leyenda de Aang). When I'm over-Spanished, I have been watching Doctor Who dubbed in French (Good, as I'm quite familiar with it) and Criminal Minds (Esprits Criminels) dubbed in French. I really should look for more actual French media, but for now I like knowing what's happening a little better.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLowePost

I watched 2 minutes of the show. Totally lost. My french isnt strong enough yet. I definitely will check it out soon. Thanks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitchryan92
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Les Revenants is the best! Also 'Engrenages' is quite good

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MPythonY
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No; but watching TV, reading, and listening to music into the language that you are learning is a huge help when it comes to becoming fluent.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperSwipe
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I use memrise to expand my vocubulary, it's all set up, and it's good! :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nnaruto25
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It really helps ^.^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindakanga
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Do you use the app, or the 'internet' interface?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
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pont, do you know of any way to get a count of how many words one knows? Is there a program or test on-line that will let you know. I am curious as I think I have more than 5000. Knowing it for sure would be a boost to my confidence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pomagranite

There are numerous apps for phones that are specifically designed to teach you vocabulary. Go through a few and see which one you really like. I prefer "Fun Easy Learn" because it teaches you all sorts of words in categories and you can always revisit them and test yourself on them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanmcd33
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Thanks for the tip! I'm using Fun Easy Learn to study Spanish now. I've set my "native" language to Norwegian, another language I'm studying, so I'm learning some new vocabulary in both languages at the same time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasPadilha
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I searched on google and I found this site http://my.vocabularysize.com/. I didn't try but I'll test my vocabularry as soon as possible.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenga_Jane

That seems to be only available for English. It was still interesting - apparently my English vocab is at around 15,700. A native speaker's vocab is 20,000.

I am a native speaker of English, and a well-educated (albeit young) one at that, as I am working my way through University, causing me to question the validity of this test. It could just be that I don't know English as well as I like to think I do, too...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonas.paul

There is some info at the end of the test regarding this:

How accurate is this test? This test was originally designed to accurately estimate up to a maximum of 14,000 word families. Native English speakers and highly proficient non-native speakers of English, however, know far more word families than that. Therefore, the number of word families reported above is an estimate based on the performance of several thousand previous results.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenga_Jane

Ah. That makes more sense. Merci!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasPadilha
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It's hard to measure exactly what we know. Nevertheless we can try estimate by some words you'll probably know and some words less common.

Although I'm not a native speaker, I think I could survive abroad with my knowledge. :)

The funny fact is that there is no magic recipe to be a good speaker. It depends on how effort you'll spend. An old saying is "Luck isn't a matter of luck, it's how much you strive. The more you practice, the luckier you are".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnAngelaras
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I lean more towards this opinion. I personally don't count how many vocabulary lists I've memorized for school but I could formulate a conversation. But I can see where everyone else is coming from :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maddyis7

15,700 is a very respectable vocab. These 'measures' are bandied around and all differ. Like you I am a reasonably well-educated native English speaker. I have heard the figure of just 5,000 used as a high-level of vocabulary ( which would obviously multiply with different conjugations or pluralisations etc, of the same word ) Then again I have heard it mentioned that the average Brit commonly uses only a core of about 1,500, on an everyday basis, which puts your Vocab into the superleague! :) I'm going to have to try the site, and will report back! But I'm a little scared as to how low my score will be. It's still slightly less than a thousand on DL Italian, after a year of practice. I'll report back regardless of whether it's good or embarrassing! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maddyis7

I got 25,700.....But I was very very careful with the test. Some questions were very simple, but many offered some very close answers that required a bit of thought. It's odd that we both have a 700 at the end of our number. I wonder what the maximum score is? Also I'd like to see what I got right or wrong. I don't know how scientific the test is, but it does seem to be well-written and imaginative!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexm08021999

I am also a native English speaker and it says I know 21,900 word families.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOCal
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Another site is http://testyourvocab.com/ They have some interesting discussion at at http://testyourvocab.com/blog/ and interesting FAQ, too. According to them, Brazilians who take English courses for about two years have a vocab of up to 3,000 words, and there are native English speaking families who function with an active vocab of as few as 2,500 words. Apparently, the key to a large vocabulary (in your native language) is reading, especially fiction, and especially before you are 15 years old.

I just did the test at http://my.vocabularysize.com/ and was told 26,800; http://testyourvocab.com has previously told me 33,500 - make of that what you will!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icundell

Hmmm. 37,600 on TYV, 28,300 on VS - consistent with your pattern. Shows how hard it is to asses - 9,000 difference is significant, surely.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajger
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I have 11,400 on VS and 22,800 on TYV. That's a BIG difference :o

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/corinnerl
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Hi Nicholas, thank you for sharing the lint to vocabularysize.com. quite interesting if someone wants to test the extent of their English vocabulary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Medard
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOCal
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Spoken French word frequency - raw data on 8774 words/meanings across 163 texts from 275 interviews: http://www.lexique.org/public/gougenheim.php

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmseiple
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One way to get a vague estimate (just to see if you know more than 5,000 words) would be to use a dictionary: open it up to a random page, count how many words you know and divide by the total number of words on the page. That should give you a rough estimate of the percentage of words you know in that dictionary. You can then multiply that by the number of words in the dictionary to figure out how many words you know. Say your dictionary has 20,000 words and 200 pages - if you know 5,000 words, then you would in theory know about 25 words on each page, assuming all of the words you know are in that dictionary. It's not horribly accurate, but it would give you some idea.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
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I like that idea and will give it a try. Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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Unfortunately I don't know of any online tests for French vocabulary size -- from the research I've read about, I have the impression that defining and measuring vocabulary size are difficult to do accurately, which is probably why estimates of "vocabulary size required for fluency" tend to vary so enormously.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noxfarm01

To this end, the 5,000 most common French words:

http://www.memrise.com/course/131111/5000-most-common-french-words/

I don't use memrise directly as I'd rather import words into Anki, but this is a good source of words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Thanks - I am going to have a play with Anki today. I like the following Word a Day page on About.com - we could always go throught the archives to find nine more :)

This is the Mot du Jour Archive page - scroll down and you can click on any of the words on any "old" calendar month to see the definition and a couple of sentences using it (with an English translation). There is also an audio file for each word.

http://french.about.com/library/motdujour/bl_motdujour.htm

The actual Mot du Jour is written each weekday day on the author's blog page. It is sometimes preceeded by either a Grammar lesson, a french expression, verb of the week, a little quiz etc etc.

The daily blog site is below, but all words are archived to the above link on a weekly basis.

http://french.about.com/b/

Other daily and weekly learning opportunities are available on the same site. They are listed on the following link if you are interested in exploring other options to supplement DL and help you achieve your goal of fluency.

http://french.about.com/od/francophonie/a/daily.htm

I have also started another discussion page so the links will be at the top of a page and easier to find if anyone wants them quickly. Search "Mot du Jour" in the Discussion Thread search bar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

I have a very hard time learning new words; 10 words a day is a little optimistic for me. I figure if I just learn SOMETHING new each day, it's progress. It'll take me a long time to get a working vocabulary, but I'll get there eventually.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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True, you should of course not aim at goals which are unrealistic for you -- but remember that even two words a day gets you there twice as fast as one a day!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HalcyonHarbinger

I like that idea!! Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FeenaQazi

point taken, maybe one word is not enough, ten shouldnt be too hard. If it is then someone can gear it down to 5 words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nnaruto25
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Spaced repetition program? Anki?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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Google is your friend :-). The top three hits for "spaced repetition" should give you a good overview:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaced_repetition
http://www.fluentin3months.com/spaced-repetition/
http://ankisrs.net/

It's an extremely effective approach, in my experience, and many other people's.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nnaruto25
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Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MegaSpy
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Yeah Google is your friend! They stalk you and make a lot of money from doing so by flooding you with adverts you don't care about! Wooh for Google stalkers inc!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pont
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AdBlock (or Adblock Plus) is also your friend :-).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheChessWizard

Why deactivated?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chachinero

Some good ideas there :)

So far, DL is imprinting at least 10 words a day in my brain. I love this site !!!

I bought the speed test and from then on I do not move on to the next skill until I am consistently getting 20 questions right for the Strengthen Skills timed test. First for the current skill and then for the overall Strengthen Skills test (testing absolutely everything covered so far).

I have also taken the opportunity to learn to type, which has slowed down things some! But it'll speed up :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OvidiaYu

That's such a great idea. I'm going to try the (& repeat) the speed test too!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slogger
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What you do (i.e., 20 questions right for timed tests) is what I do, too, and it seems to work great. And being able to type is really worthwhile. It will speed up for you, so long as you keep at it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chachinero

Yes, the words and how to structure sentences do seem to stick firmer by doing it this way. And it seems to help a lot with understanding the spoken language too. After a while, the brain does not seem to be translating from one language to the other, it's associating objects and images/actions with the words/phrases, thus allowing for greater speed. At least that's what it seems to be doing.

Typing is coming along, improving steadily. The muscle memory, or whatever it is, seems to be storing and executing certain words quickly, such as "eat", "the", "they", "you", "sono", "lui", "io". I think I should perhaps try out a proper typing tutorial too, just to hopefully speed things up with gaining the typing skill. I used the BBC one for kids, just to get to know the finger placement and which keys use which fingers: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/typing/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samy1979
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If you want to learn to speak and listen fluently you should also LISTEN to Radio, TV, Movie and Audiobooks (good if you have the text also) etc.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jenga_Jane

I love, love, love the Audiobooks idea. Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Medard
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you could try : "one thing in a french day". it is a really great podcast. It has upper-intermediate/advanced vocabulary but she speaks slowly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duck_man
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To me, fluency means being able to read, write, listen and understand, and speak and communicate with native speakers. That's a tall order. While what you describe is a step in the right direction, at best I think you can only hope to get halfway there. I don't see how you can come within a stone's throw of becoming fluent unless you live in the country and are surrounded by the people who speak the language. Frankly, I don't really think you become "fluent" with a new word in your own native language until it comes naturally to you in your vocabulary in everyday conversation.

You have to be forced to rely on the language to survive, to learn to go to it instinctively, even to dream in it. The language you hope to become fluent in has to crowd out all your tendencies to think in your native language for some extended period of time. You can become fairly good on your own, and you will become better if you are talking to someone in the language, but you will only become fluent if you are truly immersed in it. Even then, it will take a while.

I know that I am only fluent in English and that I can never hope to become fluent in another language. I just aspire to be good enough that I can go to another country, start a conversation happily and confidently in such a way that the person responds, without immediately reverting to English, in a normal manner indicating that he expects that I will understand him. I then hope that the second set of words out of my mouth will not be the equivalent of "I don't understand". That would be a good conversation for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alipaulam
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Duckman, I think what you describe as your aim in interacting with native speakers would normally count as fluent. You don't have to be at native speaker level to be fluent - being able to say what you want to say without having to think about it beforehand and without unnatural hesitation - and understanding replies you get without too many 'come? que? quoi?' - would count as fluent for me.

But I agree that a substantial degree of immersion is necessary to achieve that.

Reading and writing are irrelevant - children and illiterates can be fluent without being able to write properly or at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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I am using Memrise http://www.memrise.com/home/ for increasing my vocabulary. It is very useful site. I hope that Duringo and Memrise link up for more efficient learning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

I agree! I have been using memrise too for the past few weeks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sayali2

thanks for the website. Its just the one I was looking for. great website for vocab. it helped me. <3

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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You are welcome!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ambipath

Have you finished the duo tree then? I don't feel like dispersing my focus over several sites like that. Maybe I'll go to memrise once I finish the tree here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quirkyowl
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There's a memrise course with all of the words in duolingo in it that I've found really helpful (I'm losing less stars since I started doing it too!) http://www.memrise.com/course/61965/duolingo-french/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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I have just finished the tree about two weeks ago after almost one year struggle. Unfortunately, I found Memrise recently, so I can not tell how efficient the combination is. Memrise is not similar to Duolingo, and specialized to memorize words and phrases. I think that it is helpful for most people especially who do not have a good memory like me. Anyway, as the French says, chacun ses goûts.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quirkyowl
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Yes, each to his own. I found them a useful combination though, being so different and memrise helped me learn the vocabulary I think so then on duolingo I could concentrate more on the grammar. I'll definitely keep using memrise even though my tree is done, there are so many different courses on there!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oleron3
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Ummm. ReraCikap, the expression is à chacun son goût. Pretty basic. ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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Thank you for checking my grammer. But I learned this idiom here in Duolingo. You can enjoy long discussion about "chacun ses goûts" or "chacun son goût. https://translations.duolingo.com/comment/1491149

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oleron3
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Yes, it is possible to say à chacun SES goûtS. However, with all due respect, the conversation you referenced is actually discussing the translation into English, with comments about avoiding gender-specific references, in English. I only offered the correction because I noticed that English is not your native language. That must make it harder, to learn another language FROM English. In French, the most common use of this phrase is still à chacun son gout. Please read this: http://french.about.com/od/vocabulary/a/a-chacun-son-gout.htm About.com will not actually teach you in the quick and easy way Duolingo does, but it is a better source of the proper way to use a phrase. Quote: "Interestingly, English speakers use this expression considerably more than the French, though it has been slightly twisted into "chacun à son goût" (literally, "each one to his taste") or "chacun a son goût" ("each one has his taste"). The correct French expression, however, is (à) chacun son goût."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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Thank you, Oleron3. I appreciate your kind comment. I will never forget this idiom.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gomezkiller

why do u have such a long streak. r u addicted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quirkyowl
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I'm impressed by (and slightly jealous of) that amazing streak!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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Thank you! I'm impressed that you are always no.1 in Duolingo course in Memrise.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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Hahaha. Maybe addicted. In fact, continuation is an important factor to keep my motivation going. Besides, a long streak makes us a lingot millionaire!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quirkyowl
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haha, I think I've become slightly addicted too, but those 5 minutes here and there on the app have really added up! I've finished the lessons now, I'm just "watering" everything as much as I can and hopefully one day I'll remember them all!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

.... who can afford streak freezes? maybe? :) Great job; anyway it's quite a fun place to hang out n'est-ec pas?. I have been spending so much time reading the discussions lately that I have been ducking into my lessons for a few secs to do half a timed practice to get my my tick. Woke up this morning to 11 decayed leaves on my tree. Serves me right :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReraCikap
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Hi, puppy7989. I agree with you. Reading the discussions often steals a lot of time from us.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cantchooseaname

I like the idea of Duolingo featuring a word (at least) per day, never repeating itself. It's probably a quick and easy way of building vocabulary over time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOCal
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Check out Youtube for kids shows in French. Caillou, Petit Nicolas, Angelina Ballerina, Peppa Pig, Dora léxploratrice. These shows generally have limited vocab and slower speech, which is what you need when you are starting out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander69631

The word of the day idea is good but I think that there should be a few words instead of one to help speed up learning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

I see your point

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djb86
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I guess you can always learn your Word of the Day through the Immersion section.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunu

I have a tremendous book in french. It's an older text called "Histoire d'une Revanche" published under the Scribner French Series. I highly recommend this book. I think it is out of print but I have seen quite a few used copies available online. It is the story of the Count of Monte Christo. The first chapter begins with simple vocabulary and verb tenses that we all probably have a pretty firm grasp of. Each chapter builds on what was in the chapter previous. The story is more adult in nature and it happens to be a very good story as well. It is a book that I can't put down easily because I'm so interested in the story and so glad to be reading in french fairly easily. It doesn't feel like work to read.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hermien.DenTandt
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listen to the radio in that language, learn songs by heart in that language and watch movies in that language with subtitles in that language (Disney movies most of the time have a broad choice of audio and subtitles in different languages, I knoz Disney is not what one would regard as 'high culture' but it might be a good start) Learning poems by heart or singing nursery rhymes in your goal language might help as well, both on the vocabulary and on the grammatical side) And yet another silly willy idea to let the whole household join in: put colourful post-its on objects around the house with the name and the article of the object in your goal-language, eg latte on the milk carton, "the table"on the table, .... You can turn it into a family language quiz after a while. Another thing I am trying to do with my sons is having the conversation during diner in a certain language....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meglily333

This is a great idea! Why don't they do it already?! We do lessons at school where all you do is find new vocab and it's amazing how much you remember. I've only just started learning french on duolingo but it works - I understand much more quickly that I have at school (Sorry Miss!) but more vocab, more often would be nice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

I agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

I love all the new ideas! I think that there should be a mininmum of atleast 3 words per day. The more you upvote this document the more likely duolingo will feature the word (s) Of the day. Merci et au revoir

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bsf44
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While this is a great start, I'm not sure you can become fluent without practicing listening and speaking the spoken language. During my travels abroad, I found that I (and everyone I met) might be able to read Shakespeare/Balzac etc., but conversation was often far from fluent.

At the very least you should be watching some modern, colloquially paced TV or movies in your target language. Animated dubs (Disney etc) are a good place to start because the pacing is usually slower and the plot is familiar (context clues!). Once these become easy to follow, you can move on to the news (which is fast, but clear), but your eventual goal should be real TV, etc. If French is your goal, then I suggest Braquo on Hulu (no subs) as a good target show.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Frau_Lynda

In a 'word of the day' format think it's useful to see a word family (or related words). Or perhaps word and it's antonym. I think particularly with adjectives and verbs it's especially good to learn them in pairs. In either of these ways you can learn a few words at a time and you can hook them together.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rphilangie

oui oui, le mot du jour! bonne idée

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolWeideman

I have lived in France for 4 years. I still have problems because I cannot understand all the words spoken to me. I work daily on this and people speak French to me daily. I know the reading and writing and I have passed the exams the OFII asked me to take. When it comes to speaking I think it is an individual thing. What I found over the years is even the French do not know all the conjugation or the proper use of some words. I know one Englishman who has lived her 21 years and speaks fluently but with a very British accent, so I have come to the conclustion just do your best and it will come over time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOCal
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Absolutely. After all, how many native English speakers speak without ever making a mistake....???

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/caitlins2fab4u

This would be helpful but some people don't like the library...........like me.............

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/di_ario
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Gee. Never thought that before. But its a great idea, although for me, i just think that we need more than one word per day to become fluent. Maybe at least, hmm.. 3 to 5 words will do! Coz to much words will actually makes us confused and oftenly easy to forget.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelejoon

its good!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geeklet

Does anyone know many words are learned in a DL tree?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buunny
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French 1848 German 1710 Italian 1791 Portuguese 1942 Spanish 1571

There are a few extra words in the lessons that you can buy from the lingot store, but they don't count into the totals.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mundusfr
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English 1397 words. The English tree is one of the poorest of vocabularies. That's why I started to learn French and Italian to get more English vocabularies, in a word, all what I have learned is to improve my English. :)

But gradually, I learned Italian for good ! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SDPhil

Actually, it is probably on the same level as the other languages. Duolingo counts the different forms of the same verb. The words help and helps are considered two different words by Duolingo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Medard
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words like va, aller - maybe, but plurals definitely not

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geeklet

Merci bien! ^__^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buunny
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De rien.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geeklet

Actually, I didn't even notice it before, but they put the # of words you've learned onto your landing page. So far, I'm over 940. I'm impressed. Now I just need to learn to use them!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Reading your first book helps alot! Im reading la petite souris (See Becoming Fluent 2)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmarvin
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That's fascinating the totals are so different -- Portuguese is almost 30 percent more than Spanish. I wonder why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buunny
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Portuguese and Italian were added later than the other three. I feel like that has something to do with it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ggraceco

Good idea!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dreamspeaker

i love this idea cool

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Thank you im am full of ideas. Have you tried using memrise.com?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dreamspeaker

no i haven't thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomJB

Yes, WOTD! =D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FeenaQazi

great advice :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MandyBanandy
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As you suggested earlier Charis, a good idea to do is to change your email server (or other things, like app settings) to the language you are learning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Yes I did this helps a lot

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oleron3
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Caution: It is a good idea, but going too far with it can turn your English language (qwerty) keyboard into a clavier français and you will suddenly find that you don't have a clue where the letters are. Watch the settings carefully when you you try it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KalebGraham

Sounds like a good idea!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EllanaAngel3

I like this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Thank you please upvote it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cbatt
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Sound Advice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeWnuk1

Start a separate topic to get more people to buy in to the idea and push for it to happen maybe

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sayali2

I have just started my basic french learning lesson from yesterday & damn I'm hooked up with this language. Its interesting though I find pronounciation bit different than English but I'm trying to grasp it. ;) <3 it ^-^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TURNDOWNFORWHAT7

if you learn better with hands on stuff i suggest go on here it has helped me a lot

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pgb1969

i agree. a word of the day would be great.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prayer-warrior

thats a very good idea!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerriFreedman

I would like this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galin403

Thanks this so far is helping me I am a middle schooler who really wants to speak a laungage fluently merci bon Monsieur :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CorbsSylvia

hello

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heyimpaul33

whats up im a koala

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeSpar

I like that idea! Thank you :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dagurlgurl
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That is really a good idea!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zapper33

love it!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ale_Sm
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I would love a word of the day for every one of the languages... but it would be drag if it was a word within the lessons. The best words would be ones that aren't given in the lessons.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pinnksparkles

Nice ! I will try this. Sounds fun actually

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smashingx

I think is a really good idea. The problem would be that that word has to be depending of the level of each person. Beginners could feel like that word is too difficult to memorize or advanced users could think that would be very boring word to learn or maybe most of them would already know it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarah_lingo

that would work

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgePoincot

I'm fluent in English, Spanish, and i've been learning French for about 8 months. The most important thing is to learn the grammar, once you learn the grammar in any language, you will find it easy to pick up new words. Cuando usted esta aprendiendo un lenguaje nuevo deberia de aprender las reglas gramaticales y despues agregar mas palabras a tu vocabulario. je veux que je l'aide a toi a apprendre nouvelles langues.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abdulfargod1987

i like you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abdurrezagh1
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It is not what you read that makes you fluent, but what you remember.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AarPoe
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The french course is great, but upon doing it, I realized the main problem with Duolingo when completing the lesson Étre/Avoir. And that is: it literally doesn't teach you anything. For example when you complete Étre/Avoir, it gives you 5-6 examples of the usage, and after it says: you have learned the Skill Étre/Avoir. Did you? Can you really use all the forms of ai, as, ce, ont, etc... in speech or written form? No, you can't.

All you can do, is practice it until you really have had the skill. Please don't misunderstand me, I still think this a great app, and the fact that it's FREE, makes it an unbelievable archievement nowadays. So I keep practicing and learning, but I also keep in mind, that a golden tree is not equal with language knowledge. Guys, I would be very happy to hear your thoughts and opinions, please share it if you have any! French language is fun to learn. Allez Hongrie.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulioDaGr

That would be a very good idea

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyasiaj18

hey everyone i need your help need someone to teach spanish instead of english

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abdulfargod1987

gggg

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stc19hughd

Wassssuuuup

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iyasiaj18

hey guys add me please i really do need friends

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOCal
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If you want to have friends, it helps to actively be one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLearnerOfFre

Asking for people to add you isn't the best way to find friends. Try finding people who you think are nice when you see someone then add them if you wan't to be their freind. Just be patient and friends will come.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaileyw21

Hey your pretty smart. I like you :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scorge
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I want lingots!!! Give me your lingots!!! All your lingots are belong to us!!!

4 years ago
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