"O festival vai acontecer em março."

Translation:The festival will happen in March.

May 6, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eglimp

Here's my opinion re: the English translation of this sentence...I know "the (X event) will happen" is common usage in today's English, but in fact, with regard to events, planned events (like weddings, parties) are best described using the idiomatic 'to take place', or (passive) verb: 'to be held', while unplanned/uncontrolled events (accidents, etc.) correspond to verb 'to happen' as in this particular question..... and the verb 'to occur' is probably the best one to cover the 'middle ground' between the two distinctions.....

May 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Good note ;)

May 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eglimp

:-)

May 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sirdanilot

The festival will be in March

should be accepted. You don't say that a festival 'happens' in English (even though you do in Portuguese)

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

I disagree. I think you can say that a festival will "happen" or "occur" in English. For example:

"When is your vacation?"

"My vacation starts in June, but the festival will happen before that."

November 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

Hmm, I'm kind of with sirdanilot on this. Whilst it's not wrong to say something will happen in the future, it's not so common. The verb to be is much more common.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Fair point; it is uncommon to use "happen." If anything, when a word is on the tip of the tongue, "happen" is an sufficiently adequate term to communicate the thought. XD Quibbling over verbs #OnlyonDuolingo thumbs up

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Davu

Well, even so, I much prefer the proposal tucked away in eglimp's comment at the head of the page: "The festival is going to take place in March".

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

In my defence (that's with a c y'all), I did use 'going to take place' in my construction for this sentence.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrookeLorren

I don't know, I would have said "My vacation starts in June, but the festival will be before that."

It's a common way of putting things in English.

June 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anselmo777

"will happen" or "take place"

September 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick187019

yes, 'take place' is best in the UK

September 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilianaMateiu

I agree. The solution "The festival will take place in March" also sounds good to me. The given one seems unnatural to me.

January 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrchidBlack

How about, "the festival is happening in March"?

June 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

That is the present, but this skill is focusing on the future:

"The festival is happening in March." = «O festival acontece/está acontecendo em março.»

"The festival is going to happen in March." = «O festival vai acontecer em março.»

July 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

But present continuous is used for planned events in the near future, so is a valid translation. As a matter of fact, it is probably the most commonly used future form in English, but, and I stress this, it must be near future.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Right, I understand. In Portuguese, one can use the (simple) present, just like in the English you can use the present progressive. However, since this sentence uses the phrasal future «vai acontecer», it wants the equivalent in English "is going to happen" because we do not know whether it is in the near future. They could be saying this sentence in April, which would not at all be near to March.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreengoStarr

Again, I bow to you; you know your ❤❤❤❤ (thankfully,I know the difference between your and you're :D)!. I used and teach going to as the most appropriate translation for vai in most situations.

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Haha, I am just here to help. You are right; it is in most situations appropriate to use "is going" for «vai». Cheers. :)

December 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jelenica7

I agree with you. Present Continuous works best for scheduled future events in English.

August 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mahankr

I cannot really hear the "r" at the end of acontecer. Is it (supposed to be) pronounced?

September 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

I can hear it. It sounds like the "dd" in "buddy" in American English. In Brazilian Portuguese, the sound might change to an [h] sound when there is no word after it.

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilianaMateiu

Again the answer is pushed" without giving me the chance to write it. Why is that?

January 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WH-Paul

In the UK we are likely to say "the festival is in March" or a little less likely "the festival takes place in March" but you're never likely to hear "the festival will happen in March".

April 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becky76307

I agree with Emily. "Happen" here is less predictable, more likely serendipitous. Americans would understand, but "accidents happen" more than preplanned, organized events. The verb "to be" could be used here, but "occur" is better.

September 6, 2018
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