https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zredna

Prepositions preceding dative

Nouns following these prepositions are always in the dative case: aus, bei, mit, nach, seit, von, zu. Example: Ich gehe zu der Schule.

April 5, 2012

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelli

My high school German teacher had us memorize short lists of prepositions that use accusative and dative cases. Your post reminded me of that.

Dative: aus, ausser, bei, mit, nach, seit, von, zu

Accusative: durch, für, gegen, ohne, um

June 1, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El_Lutzo

You're right, "mit" takes the dative. "der Benutzer" (sing., nominative), "dem Benutzer" (sing., dative) BUT: "die Benutzer" (plural, nominative), and, as in the test question: "deN BenutzerN" (plural, dative)

June 16, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El_Lutzo

btw: "zu" + "der" -> "zur"

June 7, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agoetz

In one of the test questions, Duolingo says that it should be "Er spielt mit DEN Benutzern"... but Benutzern is masculine, so shouldn't it be DEM? I also learned that mit always takes a dative.

June 16, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agoetz

Oh yeah- that's helpful, thanks : )

June 16, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hyperborean

I'm afraid these are not prepositions but VERBS that follow prepositions define what case should be used. Compare 'auf dem Tisch stehen ' and 'auf den Tisch legen'. First verb means static position, second - the direction of movement. You can say also both 'auf der Straße gehen' and 'auf die Straße gehen; depending whether you are walking already by the street or heading to it.

And I find it strange that such an important topic does not seem to be discussed in this lesson.

September 8, 2013
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